Artists reflect on Lou Pearlman’s legacy: Part 11

O-Town's Dan Miller said he doesn't feel Pearlman is “responsible for my career." While Lance Bass remains angry at what Pearlman did to them, he also said “I don’t know where I’d be without him.”
2:31 | 12/14/19

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Transcript for Artists reflect on Lou Pearlman’s legacy: Part 11
When I heard that Lou Pearlman had passed away, I was so confused on exactly how to feel. I'm like, "How could you die right now when, like, we don't have this closure? You need to apologize." You don't picture that guy taking his blimp money a starting a musical revolution. The part where he ends up being a con man and dies in prison? That part you kind of believe. But the stuff in between is crazy. He always believed that his idea was going to win. Whatever it was, however ridiculous it was, he felt like he could make it happen. That man was, like, holy in my mind. I feel glad I knew Lou. I don't know where I'd be without him. So you have to give him that credit. I doubt, you know, there would've been a band without him. But the work that was put into it? I mean, I almost died for this band. Pretty sure the other four guys would say the same thing. We are the band. I created this thing, not Lou. I don't feel like he's responsible for my career. But I know that there's other members of my band who feel conflicted, because we have a career because of this band that he put together. But he also is a disgusting human being on so many levels. I thought about it for years. What I could have done different. Nothing. I'm happy where I'm at. I'm still doing what I love. He is what he is, and he gave us our start. If he would have just done it right, and not have been greedy, he could have gone down as one of the greatest music people ever. He could get anything he wanted. I feel bad for him. I feel like he's just a miserable person who wanted all these things, and then got them, and is still miserable. For folks here in central Florida who were just trying to make it day to day and trusted him with their savings, the outrage is still there. The hurt is still there. Their money is gone. Lou Pearlman stole from so many innocent people, ruined their lives. He's got what he deserved. Lou Pearlman was a con man. He was a con man when he was in the aviation business. When he was in the music business, he was a con man, when he was in the investment business. How else should we remember him as anything other than a con

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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