Michelle Obama reflects on what she wants her legacy to be: Part 6

The former first lady, whose memoir, "Becoming" is out on Nov. 13, hopes that by sharing her story, she'll inspire the next generation.
2:57 | 11/12/18

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Transcript for Michelle Obama reflects on what she wants her legacy to be: Part 6
????????? ????????? So now we're headed south, the area in between south shore and Hyde park. Where the museum of science and industry is, where the library -- Obama presidential center is gonna be -- Reporter: How important was it to put it there? It was important for both me and Barack, because, first of all, we both lived together in south shore. We lived in Hyde park. This -- these communities are ours. Our kids went to school here. I grew up here. So symbolically it was important. Reporter: Important. A landmark that she hopes will give a boost to the community that gave her and her family so much. The presidential center, the library can play a big role in bringing resources and tourism and jobs and opportunity to the south side. Good job, daddy. I did it. Reporter: And another Obama legacy, her daughters Sasha and Malia. I say this to my kids now, this is one of the greatest lessons that my mother taught me is that children -- you aren't raising babies. They're only gonna be cute and little for a little while. But then they grow up and they have to be adults in the world. And everything we do as a parent with our children, we're preparing them for adulthood. Reporter: Those two children who came into the white house as little girls left as accomplished young women. 17-year-old Sasha will graduate from Sidwell friends high school this spring, and after taking a gap year, 20-year-old Malia is now a sophomore at Harvard. It's a big day for me because I am finished with my book, and I can't wait to share it with the world. Reporter: In a rare move for a first lady, or really any other book author, Mrs. Obama will be touring the country, not in book stores but to sold out arenas. First stop, Chicago's 23,000 seat united center, moderated by Oprah Winfrey. You excited about the book? I am. I'm excited. I'm a little nervous. Reporter: Why? Well, because it -- it's -- it's my work being put out there, just like anything. It's, like, you know, I'm still that kid, "What grade am I getting? Did I do okay? Do people like it?" So I'm excited and anxious to, you know, see what people get from it. I'm hoping that it generates a conversation. Reporter: In her own words, Michelle Obama writing to inspire the next generation. There's power in allowing yourself to be known and heard, in owning your unique story, in using your authentic voice. And there's grace in being willing to know and hear others. This, for me, is how we become. Reporter: What do you want your legacy to be? Young people are the future, and if my story, my journey somehow gives them hope, if I played a role in that for some young people coming down the line, then I'll feel good about it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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