The Who's Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend reflect on fatal stampede at 1979 concert

Eleven people were trampled to death at the band's concert in December 1979 in Cincinnati.
3:32 | 12/03/19

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Transcript for The Who's Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend reflect on fatal stampede at 1979 concert
I set out to capture the special relationship created between fan and a local high school where three of the victims attended. For the first time. Ever in the through the night the change rock. Roger Daughtry and Pete Townshend share their raw feelings and they did not hold back with me about how that night affected them over the past four decades. Here's an exclusive sneak peek at his groundbreaking special. Our journey to interview those who took us 2400. Miles away from Cincinnati. To Seattle Washington. The ban was wrapping up the final leg of its move on to war Roger adultery. Pete Townsend and longtime manager bill Kirby sleep on it was time to sit down and talk about the night the change Brock. Forty years ago did it change you what happened. Well it must've done in some ways but that's subliminal you know go. But you can't you can't cook and any particular line. For forty years the band members have carried in their hearts. The loss of eleven young lives in Cincinnati before when of their shows all of the victims died of asphyxiation crushed by the crowd trying to get inside the coliseum for festival seating meaning. No with signs seats. You know one of the reasons but I do want this gone has been refused because. Wow you know the first conversation and debt that we've had a this ethos. So. You know maybe now Moscow will do so. Now there ready to heal and share how this tragedy affected rock you know culture and then personal. Talking about it is definitely a healing process. I think. Token about it here and knowing base gonna go play. To city. Two system that's he has a whole. And it's another layup. For me to haven process. Three of the eleven victims attended Finney town high school Stephen Preston Jackie Eck early. And Karen Morrison are now remembered with a Pam memorial at Sydney town. Something near and dear to the band. The people from the town need to be a parolee. Not Clinton goes from memory of those. The but didn't make it that night. On this community could. Survivors trumped any town also shared their stories that night. I think it's more. Dramatic to me than anything I've ever been around I've watched people die in the hospital. And I felt peaceful. If there was no rhyme or reason for me to understand. Why this had to happen. And family members of lives lost to remember their loved ones. Plus. The social letter. Yes. Shares stadium as she was our baby sister I think what was very hard it was such a freak accident. A freak accident that that was hard to digest. Was hard to understand that you could be waiting in line for concert. Personal perspectives from so many affected by the events of December 3 1979. Come together for the first time on television right here on WC PO. We hope you'll join us for this historic hour of television.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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