Teens reportedly smuggle burner phones to defy parents

A new report found that some teens, whose parents took away their smartphones because they felt they caused distractions, ended up smuggling burner phones to stay connected.
2:55 | 05/15/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Teens reportedly smuggle burner phones to defy parents
Thank you so much, Michael. Our "Gma" cover story and a parenting alert about a struggle families are facing in the smartphone age. Teens are getting burner phones to hide internet use from their parents, we saw it first in "The Wall Street journal" and Amy is here with more. Good morning, Amy. Reporter: Hey, Michael. Those sneaky teenagers, you know, many parents, we try to control our children's smartphone usage but more and more teens are finding a way to get second devices to use without their parents' knowledge. It's parents versus their teens' phones. It's become the feud amongst families where teens are looking to have more screen time. No more safe faces for you. You give me your phone. It's roo it there. Go biff me your burner. What's a burner? Don't insult me. Ha! For teenagers in particular, at least half of their lives are beinlived online. For many of these kids there's no difference between what's happening online and offline. A kid who is not getting access to social media or to technology is actually missing out on a huge portion of their social life. Reporter: A burner phone or a trap phone can't be traced back to you, does not have a number but can be connected to wi-fi. If your phone is broken, it's just a way to communicate with everybody. Reporter: Jalen van every was given her first phone at 14 but had her parents enforced strict rules, she began accumulating I had all these rules and my phone was always taken away because of these rules that no one else had to abide by so it was always a fight. Reporter: Even drawing up contracts with rules like no phones after 8:00 P.M. It got harder and harder to monitor that and we actually brought her into the fold to create a contract. The contract basically consisted of we would ask her plug the phone up at a certain time and that her grades had to be As and Bs. Reporter: For 18-year-old Jalen and her parents it's an issue they've been battling for the past four years. We got to the point of fighting about it where he said I'm not paying for your phone anymore. Where things started to kind of go upside down for us was our lack of consistency. Reporter: Experts say parents still need to set the example. Parents also need to remember that their example is the best lesson. If we want our teenagers to use social media wisely, we have to use it wisely in front of them too. That's right and experts say parents should watch their children's online behavior and here's something I hadn't thought about. Monitor your network to see if unknown devices are accessing your wi-fi. That might be a big clue that your children have burner phones. That is smart. Kids are smarter than we are. You got to keep track of them.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:55","description":"A new report found that some teens, whose parents took away their smartphones because they felt they caused distractions, ended up smuggling burner phones to stay connected. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"63048047","title":"Teens reportedly smuggle burner phones to defy parents ","url":"/GMA/Family/video/teens-reportedly-smuggle-burner-phones-defy-parents-63048047"}