Woke Babies founder shares inspiration for bringing diversity to children’s stories

Woke Babies, a monthly subscription series, works to highlight more Black heroes in children’s books.
2:45 | 03/04/21

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Transcript for Woke Babies founder shares inspiration for bringing diversity to children’s stories
Now as we celebrate world book day a mission to bring diversity to children's books. According to the cooperative children's book center only about 12% of children's books in the U.S. Feature black heroes and now the owner of "Woke baby" is trying to change that and linsey Davis has that story for us. Reporter: Kelly believes all children should see themselves reflected in the pages of the books they read. But after self-publishing her first children's book four years ago the uk born fashion stylist turned entrepreneur discovered just how much children's books lacked main characters who were black. Why did you feel that there was a need to create "Woke babies." I'm a firm believe you can't be what you can't see. Reporter: So "Woke babies" was born out of what she deemed was a necessity, a monthly subscription service and publisher of black children children's books. As far as seeing their image inning boos why is it so valuable. We live in such a diverse world and needs to be opportunity for all children and growing up for me, when I read a book if there wasn't a character I could relate to I kind of didn't want to read it. Reporter: "Woke babies" now helping to reimagine the classic fairy tale with a new series "The hairy tales" spell greating black heroes in their natural hair including, Zell, let out your hair. That cannot be overstated. When we see ourselves in a positive light in a ray of hues being the hero, princesses or the smart ones or scientists or focal point of an amazing story that creates momentum for us. Zell, it's time to do your hair. Reporter: Accompanied by an animation narrated by "Little fires everywhere" actress Lexi oncewood. Who mom braids Zell's hair, it takes forever. What drew you to her? It reminds me of my friends and I growing up. I know the struggles of not wanting to get my hair done. She is a queen, a principal set on her own with her beautiful crown which is her hair and she doesn't need straighter hair or to change anything about her to feel like a princess. I think that's beautiful. And Zell loves her hair. Reporter: For "Good morning America," linsey Davis, ABC news, New York. You know what, linsey has written some terrific children's books as well. "Woke babies" books aren't just for black families. Half of their subscribers who are white parents who realized they need to introduce their kids to other cultures.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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