How some retailers are cracking down on their return policies

A new report by The Wall Street Journal states that some return policies at popular retailers could potentially be used against you.
2:42 | 03/28/18

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Transcript for How some retailers are cracking down on their return policies
We move on to that shopping alert. Some big stores like Best Buy are keeping track of your return history limiting what you're allowed to bring back and even issuing suspensions for what they call habitual returners. It's a story we first saw in "The Wall Street journal" and ABC's Becky Worley has more. Reporter: Ah, the return counter. A staple to shoppers the world over except for Jake zacker. He returned a few things at best Buy then was banned for making an returns there for and entire year. The boxes were unopened. Reporter: He says he bought three iPhone cases in the same store over several months and returned them all within the policy window. The clerk just said, hey, you know, you've reached a limit. Shouldn't have to walk out of there feeling like I did something wrong. Reporter: Banned for a year for returning a few iPhone cases? Turns out Best Buy and other retailers use a company called the retail equation to flag customers who allegedly show signs of possible return fraud. The goal, minimize illegal returns for used or stolen items or things purchased at a competing store. It's a serious problem. Reportedly totally up to $15 llion in loss for retailers every year. It's preveptsdzing fraud and in other way it's hitting the consumer. Reporter: Others experienced it about brands who use the retail equation. I bought three iPhone cases at one Best Buy and returning them the next day at two others. Hi. Returning. How many days do I have normally for a return? 15. 15 days. There's no penalty for bringing it back in that time frame, right? Oh, no. Reporter: At the next best Buy. I returned a couple other things recently and I read some article go that. Is that going to be a problem? I don't think so. Reporter: It wasn't. Wow, that was fast. Yeah, yeah. Reporter: There was no mention of being banned from future returns. It's hard to know what triggers Best Buy's return algorithm but clearly my actions didn't. Best Buy telling us we apologize to anyone inappropriately affected. We'll take a hard look at what we're doing and determine how we can make it better. A spokesperson for the retail equation adding the vast majority approximately 99% of returns are accepted. It's difficult to figure out exactly what triggers these bans but some say returning a large percent of your purchase or buying and returning items that tend to get stolen often, even returning just before closing time. Those are some of the guesses but bottom line, Amy, it's hard to know what exactly is making this happen but it's happening. Yeah, good to know it can happen and what you can do. Becky, thank you very much as always.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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