Chinese space station enters the atmosphere

Most of the space station likely burned up as it entered Earth's atmosphere while remaining debris landed in the South Pacific Ocean, authorities said.
1:08 | 04/02/18

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Transcript for Chinese space station enters the atmosphere
Now to the massive Chinese space station plummeting towards Earth. No one knew quite where the debris would land. Now we have answers, hopefully answers that are good answers. Linsey Davis is here. What's going on? Reporter: Good answers and good morning to you. You could call it a successful splash landing. After days of anticipation. The out-of-control Chinese space station finally reentered Earth's atmosphere around 8:15 Sunday night. Most of it likely burned up as it reentered the atmosphere. Any surviving debris landed in the south pacific ocean. Far away from pop lated areas. Near an area known as the spacecraft graveyard. Who knew such a thing existed? When governments and space agencies have a controlled reentry, this is where they want to bring things down. One scientist said overnight you couldn't have scripted this any better. Paula? It's the best case scenario.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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