Florida expert brought in to capture gator in Chicago

Authorities closed Humboldt Park because of the influx of tourists and residents trying to catch a glimpse of the 5-foot alligator nicknamed "Chance the Snapper."
2:39 | 07/16/19

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Transcript for Florida expert brought in to capture gator in Chicago
We're back with the search for that alligator on the loose in a Chicago park. First spotted a week ago, today officials there have now shut down part of the area to visitors and called in an expert from Florida to help catch it. Gio Benitez is there, has the latest for us. Good morning, gio. Reporter: Hey, robin, good morning to you. Yeah, this gator has caused a lot of excitement and frustration here in this area. Take a look behind me. You can see that lake right now. It is now fenced off. But officials believe that gator chance the snapper is hiding somewhere in there. It's been dubbed gator gate an ee lose I have alligator hiding in the lake at humboldt park. Authorities are closing in on the animal and closing off the We have to walk around the whole park just so they could catch the alligator. They tried to catch him all week. This is ridiculous. The area shut down not only for safety reasons but because so many residents and tourists are flooding the park hoping to catch a glimpse. The gator so popular it even has a nickname, chance the snapper. They're bringing in an expert from Florida to help find and catch the cold-blooded intruder. High hope is that we will be able to locate the alligator and make sure that people in the surrounding communities are Reporter: Of course, gators are not indigenous to Chicago. Officials believe someone had the gator as a pet and illegally dumped it here. When they hatch they are owe only 9 to 11 inches long and raising it as a pet and now four to five feet, too big for the bathtub and tank and thought they were doing the right thing by releasing it. Reporter: Chicago residents are thinking about the gator's well-being. I hope they're able to deal with it in a humane manner. Reporter: We should tell you officials are trying to keep this area as quiet as possible because they hope that that gator comes out of hiding if it sees that everything is nice and quiet here and by the way we should tell you that police are investigating. They want to know who released chance the snapper. Robin. Shouldn't you be whispering so you can't -- Maybe he should be helping out in the investigation. I've just been told that gio is a licensed alligator hunter. Is that true? Yeah, yeah, I went gator hunting with "Nightline." So now you have an official license? That's a thing. I guess it is. I needed to get the license. You're the expert that was brought in? Okay, didn't know. Didn't realize that. From Florida. All right, gio, good luck out Coming up next we have "Play

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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