UVA women's basketball coach quits to fight for her daughter's adoption

Joanne Boyle, who led the University of Virginia women's basketball team, resigned in order to finalize the adoption of her 6-year-old daughter from Senegal.
4:21 | 03/30/18

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Transcript for UVA women's basketball coach quits to fight for her daughter's adoption
We'll switch gears and go to our cover story. It's about a star college basketball coach at the top of her game but suddenly retired. This happened last week. She did it so she could fight full time to keep her adopted child. ABC's Diane Macedo has her story. Good morning. So Joanne Boyle says she's been her daughter's legal guardian since 2014 but while she says a Senegal court has completed her adoption, the U.S. Has not and now she says in order to make it happen she has to take her back to Africa and has no idea when Thea'll be back. Just last week Joanne Boyle was coaching the university of Virginia women's basketball team to the NCAA tournament. Now the 54-year-old says she's gearing up for a new battle, the fight to finalize the adoption of her 6-year-old daughter ngoty from Senegal. A process that could take months or even years. You know, a lot of times you're getting phone calls of just good news/bad news, good news/bad news and go on the emotional roller toast Kerr. Reporter: She obtained legal guardianship in 2014 and brought her to the U.S. In a tourist Visa. She overstayed it because ngoty was sick. In order to apply for more permanent paperwork ngoty has to go back. The best case scenario, we go to Senegal and finalize this process in the next hopefully couple of months and come home with her Visa and her U.S. Citizenship. Reporter: Virginia senator Tim kaine is one of many trying to help Boyle. He tells ABC news he asked immigration officials to grant Joanne approval so she and ngoty don't have to go to Senegal while ngoty's adoption is finalized. U.S. Citizen tells us privacy issues prevent them from discussion the specific case and they work toward efficiently processing immigration applications and petitions. Now they are preparing to make that more than 4,000-mile journey back to Senegal for final checks so that ngoty can finally come home for good. Whether we have to leave for a shored period of time or longer period, that's what we'll do and finalize the journey no matter how long it takes. Reporter: The big challenge in the U.S., she has lots of family and friends to lean on while in Senegal it's just her and ngoty. This was the only option. They'll do whatever it takes to see it through. Okay, Diane, thanks very much. Dan Abrams is here right now. Why is this the only option? Well, look, this is a difficult process because it seems that she left Senegal on a tourist Visa meaning she hasn't actually finalized all of the paperwork that one needs. Seems like a situation to me where someone said to her there, you're okay. We can figure this out, the child is sick. You can take the child. You know, we can figure this out later. Now the answer, well, actually we can't and let's be clear. She has spent so much time and effort to get this child here, sick child. A really caring mother. Incredible Yi caring mother. There's steers go her since back in 2015 making this child part of the basketball team. How all the players were helping to effectively bring her up. Really heartwarming stories about how much effort she's made to try to do this by the book. We saw senator Tim kaine step in as well. She's going back too Senegal. What's her best hope? She has to get in the citizens and immigration services' pipeline in effect. Senator Tim kaine is trying to speed up that process because for now they're saying you can't apply for it from here. You have to go to Senegal to apply for it. That's where you're talking about the difference between months and years. Remember, years for her means being in Senegal for years alone -- Not working? To get there just to be clear how far away it is, not only the eight-hour fly but eight to nine-hour drive every time she goes there and rocky roads, et cetera, this is not an easy process but there is a law, there are the rules that have to apply. You're talking about sensitive stuff which adoption and immigration. So, you know, it's not -- it's just not that easy. Let's hope she can work through it quickly. I spent some time with Joanne and also the team recently and I have to tell you everything that you said about her, about how the team has raglied around that little girl and I'm so proud of Joanne, nothing is more important to her than this and we wish her all the best. We sure do.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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