Blue light glasses are the latest wellness trend, but do they actually work?

As glasses that cut out blue light from screens rise in popularity, Dr. Jennifer Ashton breaks down what to know about them and shares tips on how to get better sleep.
3:42 | 04/19/19

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Transcript for Blue light glasses are the latest wellness trend, but do they actually work?
We've got a "Gma" health now. Listen to statistic. Adults spend more than 11 hours a day interacting with media, including staring at phones, computers and TV screens that are all glowing with blue light. How helpful or harmful is that Dr. Jen is back to tell us all. The audience is going to help us out with this. You have your paddles, ready to go. We're going to take a quiz and show is your answer. 50% chance of getting it right. The first question, really hard, true or false, is blue light bad for you? Oh wow. Is it a coincidence that the true color is blue? This is actually a trick question because in some cases it's good for you, okay. So blue light which we get during the daylight, sunlight hours actually helps stimulate us. It keeps us awake, alert, gives us energy, improves our mood. At night because of those sir Canadian rhythms it's not good for you, keeps us awake, disrupts our sleep. You sort of just gave a hint. I think we have another question. One more time. Blue light disrupts sleep, true or false? Good, that means they're paying attention. But not you guys. I know, I did give it away a absolutely it does. Now, obviously not when you get exposed to blue light during the daytime but at night 100%. So that's why you hear sleep experts and all the way down to pediatricians say get rid of those screen kind of interactions at least two hours before you want to be asleep because you don't want to be alert, awake, engaged when you're supposed to be sleeping. It's all about those sir Canadian rhythms. You brought props. I did. These glasses we keep hearing about that are blue light blocking glasses. Is that what they do I guess? This is a huge marketplace but when we consulted experts we say they're not going to do any harm but there's not really conclusive scientific data that they're going to help and they can be expensive. So again, right now this is kind of all out there in the marketplace but not so much data behind it. The things you can do, just shift your phone to the night mode and again at least two hours before you want to be asleep, put that screen or that laptop or that computer away. That's for blue light digital stream which we all sort of suffer with. Tips on that? These can help that a little bit but if you're in front of a screen all day long, your eyes can get dry. You're not going to get necessarily any eye disease but it can strain your eyes. We've got some other health alerts. Good morning to you. This is Nora. You work on our medical unit. She's one of our doctors. So what are we talking about in terms of how we all should be sitting at a computer? Think about how many of us are in front of their computers really, really close. All the time. This is where, again, I call it -- not just me but a 20-20-20 rule. So approximately every 20 minutes you want to take 20 seconds away from looking at the screen and stare 20 feet in the distance, kind of just give your eyes a break. Are you going to give us some assistance? I think we have another -- This is another tip and we use the term 25 inches, Cecilia. This is something I never thought I would be doing in medical school, working with the Easter bunny. 25 inches away, farther than you think. That's way farther than you would expect to be sitting. This is the way we should be sitting at the computer. Keep that distance. You set a 20-minute timer on your phone and carry one of these at all times. Anti-glare screens, turn down the brightness, all common sense things to help your eyes. Thank you. Ginger, over to you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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