Dr. Jennifer Ashton on book 'Life After Suicide'

ABC News' Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton wrote "Life After Suicide" about addressing grief after the loss of a loved one.
3:34 | 05/23/19

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Transcript for Dr. Jennifer Ashton on book 'Life After Suicide'
Death due to suicide is it different kind of death. And any other kind of the grief that follows and death of a loved one due to suicide is a different type of grief. In February of 2017. Miami. Reason. Ex husband by reason. Our divorce was finalized eighteen days. Before her robbed and killed himself. Rob was a doctor. Rob had no history of mental illness or depression. And none none of the signs that were taught about it in medical school. And it completely blind sided us. And yeah this. So hard to be so close to the spot. Where. Frogs spent his last minutes second. It's. Can't really describe it I try not to think about robs last. An air and so. And so violent and so scary and so. Came home. It's an irrational act and so the people who are left behind are trying to think rationally about something that is by definition irrational. And so. Understanding. In. Is almost impossible. I just released a book called life after suicide finding courage comfort and community after unthinkable loss. And really my focus in the book is on the first word of the title that's on the work life. After suicide not suicide. And I seen bad. The people who are living. The need to. He supported it in terms of being able to talk openly about what they went through the most. Helpful friends that I had. We just literally send me random texts not expecting an answer but just saying you know hi honey I'm thinking about you. With some cute you know and OG and that need a huge difference. Alex said. Dad lost his. Battle with an illness he had a disease that helps him no different than cancer and we wouldn't be angry at someone for losing their battle with cancer. So we should not be angry at a person who dies by suicide my Mon Tra has become if you wanna heal you have to feel. And that means you know you can shove your keen. Or any of the emotions that come. Specifically to losing a loved one to suicide in a corner or in a box and barricaded away. I really felt that the hard part was admitting a lot of things I talk about myself. Then admitting it to millions of people disease. The hard part is always admitting it to yourself.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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