Has flu season peaked or will cases continue to increase?

National levels of flu-like illness remain high and have been elevated for nine weeks, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
2:18 | 01/11/20

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Transcript for Has flu season peaked or will cases continue to increase?
Ugh, no. No, ew. If you've ever had the flu you know it hits you like a ton of bricks and we are in the thick of flu season right now. So we brought in our chief health correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton with the latest numbers. What do we know at this point? The numbers came out yesterday, Dan, the CDC updated us and there appears to be a little bit of good news at least in the last week. The estimates if you take a look, almost 10 million Americans affected by the flu so far. Almost 90,000 flu-related hospitalizations and the estimates are about 4,800 estimated flu-related deaths. So while the trend dipped a little bit we are not out of it. The flu season goes till April. It is not too late to get the flu shot. It's a great reminder of how serious this is. Yeah. You just said it there. Just to make sure we amplify the point we are not out of the woods yet at this point. No, absolutely and, you know, the reason the CDC updates the country on the numbers every week is because they change week to week. And so we follow it pretty closely but I think people need to understand you mentioned the symptoms because there's so much confusion what they have, what don't they have. The flu -- high fever, headache, cough, body aches and chill, fatigue, even some G.I. Symptoms. If you have those symptoms stay home, if they're getting worse and not better see a health care provider. There is another medical topic in the news this morning. We're looking at a national blood shortage. This is really actually big news. We just got it yesterday that the American red cross now is dramatically short on O positive -- o-type blood. It's the universal donor. They have in some cases less than three days' supply partially due to coming out of the holiday season and partially believe it or not due to the flu. Most people think they're not eligible to donate blood and, in fact, most people are. So you can easily go to the American red cross site. Check eligibility criteria. Most can donate and fun fact, this is so important. The American red cross is teaming up with the NFL between now and January 19th. Anyone who goes to donate blood is automatically entered in a sweepstakes to get two tickets to the super bowl. So not only are you literally saving someone's life you might go to Miami to see football. How we do it, we go to the red cross website. Check that site. Again, most people are eligible to donate.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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