Women may not be getting enough information about heart disease, AHA warns

The American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued a new advisory asking OB-GYNs to screen for heart health risks.
2:33 | 05/11/18

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Women may not be getting enough information about heart disease, AHA warns
for women about a new recommendation that is coming out that your ob/gyn should check your heart health when you go in for a visit and Jen is here so tell us about that. Good morning. This is huge news in women's health. Really the first time that the nation's ob/gyn association collaborated with the American heart association, why? Because we're talking about the number one killer of women in this country which is heart disease and the fact that it has been recognized that ob/gyns are the definitive primary care physicians that most women see so not to discuss risk factors for heart disease and do screening for those risk factors is a massivefermedad missed opportunity over the course of a woman's lifetime. We are hearing more and more about the gender differences when it comes to that. Can you explain more? It's not just about what causes heart disease differently in women than men. It's not just about the fact they can have different symptoms. If you look at these risk factors this is staggering. For the same risk factor when you put it head-to-head, diabetes, a woman with diabetes has a 19% increased risk of heart deed. A man with diabetes only a 10% increase. If you trach an obese woman that increases her risk for heart disease by 64%, in an obese man, just 46% so when you look at these risk factors that are well woman ob/gyn checkup this is a target to risk reduction in terms of behavior, lifestyle and -- Give us a bottom line. Women need to know their reproductive health issues that occur in gynecology known to be stress tests for women. They are risk factors for future heart disease so just under pregnancy you're talking about gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, a preterm delivery, polycystic ovarian symptoms or hormone use. These are in the ob/gyn primary care wheelhouse and known to affect a woman's risk of heart disease so very exciting. One hand has to talk to the other now. How is that going to work? Look, our women can actually educate their doctors. When they go to their say did you know now you're supposed to be collaborating with the cardiology colleagues in my family, my father is a cardiologist so this has been in nye blood but I'm so happy to see this official collaboration happening. I can hear women -- I saw Dr. Jen on "Gma" and she said what happened was, yes. You better talk to your

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":55093174,"title":"Women may not be getting enough information about heart disease, AHA warns","duration":"2:33","description":"The American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued a new advisory asking OB-GYNs to screen for heart health risks. ","url":"/GMA/Wellness/video/women-information-heart-disease-aha-warns-55093174","section":"GMA","mediaType":"default"}