American Academy of Pediatrics releases new juice recommendations

Dr. Jennifer Ashton appears live on "GMA" to discuss the new guidelines for parents on children's juice consumption.
3:00 | 05/22/17

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Transcript for American Academy of Pediatrics releases new juice recommendations
Before you reach for the juice this morning the American academy of pediatrics is out with new recommendations on how much they should drink and babies shouldn't have it at all and Dr. Jennifer Ashton is here, a nutritionist as well. Any time you see doctors weighing in on diet, food, nutrition, it's usually because there is a pretty conclusionive association between a food or beverage and a health or disease outcome. That's what we see going on right now. We have the country's top pediatricians weighing in on fruit juice for baby, kids and teens and while some 100% fruit juice can be okay, in general it doesn't pack the nutritional punch that a lot of parents think it does. Tell us more why they're making these recommendations. I think from a nutritional standpoint too much fruit juice in kids has been associated with poor nutrition and increased risk of tooth decay, we know that dentists know about that and increased risk of G.I. Juices and unpasteurized juices can contain harmful bacteria and potential for drug/joust interactions. They do need to keep that in mind. Should not rely solely on the juice. If you put the fruit juice version head-to-head with the whole fruit version as we have here, if you look at just eight ounces of apple juice you see about 114 calories, 24 grams of sugar which is a lot and zero dietary fiber. When you compare that the apple the big difference is in the finer. You're getting four grams of fiber in the whole fruit and that is really important for G.I. Issues so you always want to reach for the whole fruit versus the juice. How much juice is okay. If you take a look at this chertoff, this is pretty important. Babies to 1 year of age really none unless recommended by a pediatrician which sometimes does happen. When you're talking about toddlers 1 po 3 years of age, 4 ounces a day, no more. Four to 6-year-old, easy to remember, 4 to 6 ounces and 7 to 18, 8 ounces per day, no more. You want to go for the whole fruit version. I can sense them putting down the juice at home. Step away from the juice. Thank you very much Michael. All right, thank you, robin.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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