How to Avoid Germs in Your Child's Lunchbox

That lunchbox may have more than just the food you packed.
2:52 | 04/10/15

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Transcript for How to Avoid Germs in Your Child's Lunchbox
We're back at 7:42 with "Gma investigates" and this morning it's all about kids' lunch boxes. Many of us parents packing them every day. You might be doing it now but we may not stop and think about the germs lurking inside. ABC's Alex Perez has more on why we might want to. Reporter: A ham sandwich, an apple with a side of bacteria? Your child's lunch box may have more in it than the food you pack this morning including some yucky germs. All: Hi, Mr. Perez. Reporter: With the help of a fifth grade class, "Gma investigates" how germy is your child's lunch box? How many of you don't know when you clean your lunch box? Just about everybody, huh? My dog knocks my lunch box on the floor and then he probably like licks inside of it. Reporter: How many times have you wash it? My mom says she washes it every week. Reporter: The school encourages kids to keep their hands clean to avoid spreading germs at lunch. We actually in our lunch room have hand sanitizer, machines that the children can access. Reporter: We swab 24 lunch boxes, both inside and outside to see what kind of bacteria could be growing. We send them off to Dr. Susan Whittier, a my crow biologist with new york-presbyterian hospital in Columbia. I was shocked at how wrong I was. Reporter: Every single lunch box we test was growing some sort of bacteria both inside and outside. Most of the lunch boxes carried the bacteria bacillus often found in soil. It's not unexpected that we would find bacillus on the outside of fruits and vegetab vegetables. Reporter: But some included really nasty bacteria. Four had staph. Three had E. Coli and we found three other bacteria commonly found in bathrooms. Some of the lunch boxes had as much bacteria as you'd expect to find in a train station toilet and the fact that your food is sitting in there, yeah, it's gross. These bacteria were to get into a cut or your eye by touching your face they could cause an infection. Reporter: Parents were pretty grossed out. I think I'm very surprised. I'm glad it was not as bad as it could have been. Lunch box will be immediately burned this evening. Reporter: But Whittier says there is an easy fix. Take a disinfectant wipe or bleach wipe and clean them out and let them dry overnight. There will not be an ounce of bacteria in that lunch box the next guys you come swab. Reporter: For "Good morning America," Alex Perez, ABC news, New York. And from the desk a collective yuck. I know what I'm doing this afternoon, kids.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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