Are pilotless planes the future of air travel?

ABC News' Nick Watt reports on new research about pilotless planes, which would be huge savings for the airline industry and possibly passengers but still face major questions.
2:46 | 08/09/17

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Transcript for Are pilotless planes the future of air travel?
You've heard of a driverless car on the streets already but what about a plane without a pilot, Michael? That's a plane I'm not on. That's a plane without a passenger in my opinion. But new research said they could be the future of air travel with huge savings for the airline area and maybe passengers as well but major questions and Nick watt is at air Hollywood. Questions. In L.A. With details, Nick, tell us about this new research. What's going on with this? Reporter: Well, first of all, let's see what this will look like. We're talking no people in the cockpit of a plane, no fancy epaulets, no pilots, pilotless. UBS did this research and they say it could save the industry $35 billion a year. So there is real incentive to try and make this happen to save some cash, guys. I'm still just trying to let it all set in here. So you're saying there's -- how can -- how can that be, Nick? I mean, how realistic is this? It's pretty realistic. One Boeing boss recently said that the building blocks as he put it are already there. This could happen -- don't forget autopilot has been in some form or another for 100s not like the "Airplane" movie autopilot but UBS says this could happen technically feasible by 2025. But yet autopilot but you still have a pilot there. Somebody is taking over to take off and land. In the air is fine. Put it on autopilot but the question is we know what the industry is thinking about this but what are the passengers thinking about this? What is the response? Reporter: Yeah, well, Michael, that's not so Rosie. People are a bit like you, 54% of people polled said they would be reluctant to get into a pilotless plane. Only 17% said they would be gun ho and most of the people keen on this are younger people but pilots union, pilots alliance, they are unsurprisingly say it's a terrible idea and nothing can replace pilots or crew in terms of spotting a problem before it happens, dealing with those kind of issues and keeping people safe. They say terrible idea. All of those things. Nick, would you get on a pilotless plane? Michael, I would get on a pilotless plane. I would rather get on a pilotless plane than a driverless car. There's less to crash into up there and if it does make the tickets cheaper, I'm in. Whatever. Robin. No. 2-1. I'm not getting on it either, man. Good for you, Nick. Good for you. You're alone. Uh-huh. Coming up a a B H healthlelert

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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