New study reveals California may be overdue for earthquake

The "GMA" team of insiders analyzes some of the biggest stories trending this morning.
5:29 | 03/08/17

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Transcript for New study reveals California may be overdue for earthquake
In a commercial break. T.J. Holmes is back with us on the big board. We'll get to him in a moment. First can a catastrophic earthquake soon rock the west coast? And an alarming new study from the U.S. Geological survey reveals a section of the San Andreas fault near L.A. May be overdue for one. ABC's Matt Gutman joins us from an earthquake simulation room in southern California. Going to get rocking in just a moment, but first, Matt, tell us about this survey. Reporter: Well, basically, robin, everybody who lives in southern California at some point is going to be doomed so these seismologists went to a section of the San Andreas fault basically 30 miles away from los Angeles, the second biggest metropolitan area in the united States, what they found is that over the past 1200 years on average, about every 100 years there is a massive 7.5 to 7.9 and we haven't had a major earthquake here in 160 years so you can imagine all of that energy built up along the fault. Now, in 1994, the northridge earthquake walloped southern California, especially los Angeles. That one lasted for only 15 seconds. They say the big one could last for minutes. Wow. And the question is, the question is, not how long it will last or when it's going to happen, but it is going to happen. Now, my earthquake guys hit the simulator a little earlier than we expected. But what you want to have is a 7.5 or an 8, you want to drop because everything in your house is going to come off the shelves. All of the heirrooms that are basically made your life special are going to turn into shrapnel. Most people get hurt by walking on glass that has shattered everywhere so what you want to do is drop, hold on to something and cover up, grab a teddy bear if you want or anything. What you want to do is cover your head. A desk is a good thing. Not over yet. Now it's over. A desk is a good thing to cover up under. Mostly you want to protect your head. The biggest concern in a massive earthquake like that is not necessarily people's houses. A lot built over the last 20 years have been built much stronger able to withstand an earthquake like that. What people are concerned about is the infrastructure, robin, the ago question ducks leading water to Los Angeles, electricity grids. And if those go bad and are severed that could set los Angeles back by decades. Many were wondering about the rain in California. That could be contributing to what may be coming next. Matt, thank you for that simulation. Glad you survived it. Barely but the teddy bears helped. Good to know. Keep one handy. My segment is going to be lame now. I'm excited about yours. This is about running and enhancement there so Nike's revolutionary new shoe they are hoping will help break one of the sports world's most elusive records running a marathon in under two hours. Wow. I mean that's pretty incredible, T.J. Back in 190 of the best marathon runners in the world were clocking in at about three hours so that's incredible. Less than two. How is this possible. Well, some of that is just evolution, right, human beings evolve. The training evolves but also technology evolves and equipment so that's what Nike is honing in on now. There's the shoe, the new equipment. Now, the key to the shoe, the vaporfly elite. They are putting three of these custom-made shoes on the feet of the best marathoners in the world hoping to break this record. Hoping to break the two-hour mark. You see that heel. That's the key. There is a carbon fiber plate that propels you forward. So it essentially gives you spring in your step, if you will and they make the shoe lighter and they are thinking this will help propel these folks. The world record right now is 2:257. Thousand, to shave three minutes off that. World records break in sections or fractions of a section, three minutes is pretty ambitious. Nike is not the only game. Adidas, the space wars. Now the shoe wars. Talk about billions of dollars at stake and Adidas has their own plan, they have their own shoe. Their subzero they've already debuted, made it lighter. Think it's going to make the runners faster. Key to Nike here, let me put a little caveat, they are doing this in a controlled environment. This is not just they'll put it on the foot of some runner at the New York marathon. Doing it on a formula 1 track with perfect weather conditions, they've even taken into consideration solar radiation, they're putting them in special suits, doing all this to just break the record so it's not just about the shoe but if somebody runs under two hours in a marathon, the next day you'll see an ad from Nike saying, hey, what he did, the impossible, he was wearing this shoe. It can make you faster. Controversial because we remember what happened to Michael Phelps in the beijing olympics because he had that suit on and gave him an unfair advantage they say. Could the same be said of these marathoners. It's unfair because they had technology making them faster. This world record first of all won't count because it's not officially sanctioned and they're looking into it. Nike says we think it's aboveboard but this international athletics federation is looking at it to make sure it is -- Will it help me get a seven-minute mile. What do you run now? About nine. I've never done a marathon. 10k. You'll need a car. Thanks, T.J.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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