Supplies run short in Florida before Hurricane Irma

Floridians are waiting in lines for dwindling supplies of gas, water, plywood and sandbags and boarding up their properties to guard against winds expected to reach 145 mph.
1:58 | 09/06/17

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Transcript for Supplies run short in Florida before Hurricane Irma
prompted Florida to make its building code some of the toughest in the nation. Those structures could now face their biggest test yet and ABC's Alex Perez is in Miami with more on how everyone is getting ready. Good morning, Alex. Reporter: Hey, good morning, George. Some of these hopes right here along the ocean could be the first to get slammed by the hurricane. Officials here in miami-dade say evacuations could be begin as early as this evening. Overnight, a run on gas. Well, the gas lines are crazy. Reporter: Station after station across some of the sunshine state's biggest cities out of fuel. They put up caution tape. Nobody has any. Reporter: Some drivers sitting in bumper-to-bumper lines in some cases waiting a half hour or more just to get to the pump. If you're at a gas station without fuel there will be fuel coming. Reporter: And critical supplies also running short as floridians stock up. Absolutely crazy. The lines wrapped around the entire inside of the store. Reporter: Emptying stores of plywood and water, even filling sandbags. It's very important that everybody in our state gets prepared. Three days of water per water and food per person. Make sure you're ready. Reporter: Many residents are boarding up their properties with wind speeds expected to hit a powerful 145 miles per hour. Here in Miami, some of the first targets, these beachfront skyscrapers. Hurricane Andrew flattened parts of southern Florida 25 years ago. High-rises here are now designed with some of the strictest building codes in the nation. Nothing is 100% hurricaneproof. The only thing that is 100% hurricaneproof is a bunker but who would live there. Reporter: Balconies and windows a danger zone for flying debris and increasing on the upper levels where the wind can be much more violent. Any items left curbside as the storm approaches can become harmful project ties in high winds. Reporter: And at this point fuel shipments are still coming in restocking those empty gas stations. Officials here are telling tourists who are here on vacation to go home. Robin. All right, Alex, thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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