One woman's story of exercise addiction

A new medical review calls attention to exercise addiction and highlights how people can become obsessed with and have withdrawal effects from exercise.
1:57 | 04/27/17

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Transcript for One woman's story of exercise addiction
Back now with that new report about working out and whether you can become adikd to it. Experts say exercise addiction is real and Jesse palmer has the details for us. Reporter: Katherine shriver always enjoyed exercising. I was going twice a week for about an hour. Reporter: Until she felt she couldn't live without it. It became very obsessive. Reporter: Katherine had an exercise addiction. I would go to the gym or do something physical three times a day. Reporter: The disorder outlined in the British medical journal. It's a compulsive and obsessive relationship with exercise that has negative consequences. Reporter: Addiction specialists think it triggers endorphins in the brain. This is not the ordinary healthy exercise recommended by most doctors. When people engage in high volumes of exercise, have constant injuries, and skip out on work or family obligations to exercise, they're workout goals have gone too far. Katherine was even exercising injured. Back at the gym after diagnosed with two stress fractures and a back injury that needed surgery. I forced myself to exercise anyway. Reporter: Experts warn exercise addiction can occur with and without food issues. It has nothing to do with achieving a goal. It's just an endless cycle. Reporter: She had always struggled with body image and self-esteem issues and working out took away those feelings. The number one feeling is shame and this feeling that I'm not okay the way I am. Reporter: She eventually sought out therapy, and today the 28-year-old is able to exercise without it becoming an obsessive habit. What's different now is I revolve my life around my life, not around exercise. Reporter: The report goes on to say that health care professionals can diagnose exercise addiction. It begins with focused questionnaires and moves on to a range of treatments that may include extensive therapy. Surprising stuff. It's a real thing. An addon that people need to take seriously. Jesse, thanks so much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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