7 Black mothers mourning the loss of their children discuss their shared bond

ABC News’ Deborah Roberts speaks to the moms of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Botham Jean, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Antwon Rose and Trayvon Martin about their losses and being a Black mom in the U.S.
7:48 | 07/14/20

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Transcript for 7 Black mothers mourning the loss of their children discuss their shared bond
I think we all hope and pray that when it's our child, you don't have to see it anymore. And every time you see another one, it takes you right back to the day that it happened to you. Reporter: Michelle Kinney knows grief in a way few of us do. The kind that wracks your body, pierces your soul. In 2018, her son Antoine was shot dead by a police officer as he ran unarmed from a traffic stop in their Pittsburgh hometown. It brings about a bond that I can't begin to explain. And I think the reason that that happens is because no one understands what this pain truly entails. Reporter: But these other six black moms do. They all lost their children, they say, due to America's legacy of racism. It's rooted in pain, but marked by action. Wanda and Tameka are the newest members. Ahmaud arbery and breonna Taylor were both killed. You sent a message to breonna's mom on her birthday? Yes, ma'am. Reporter: What did you say? I wanted her to know that I knew that day would be very difficult. Ahmaud had a birthday on may 8th, and it was days prior to the video being released. That was one of the most heartbreaking days that I've ever had. And I wanted her to know that I know her pain. And I was there to support her. Reporter: Miss palmer, tell me about what that meant to you. Because this is so fresh. It was nice to get the message, just to know that somebody feels the way that I feel. You have so much anger inside of you, so much disbelief over what happened to your child. To know that she talked about, you know, having the best day that day. Going out to dinner with her boyfriend, and going home to watch movies. To know she was in her house, in her own bed, and someone kicked in her door and killed her. To know that she didn't deserve it. Reporter: Sabrina Fulton's pain hasn't eased, her son was trayvon martin. I felt like I was never going to be happy again. I went from 95% of the time being happy to 95% of the time being sad. When I first started out, the hoodie would make me sad. Now I smile about it, because I've trained and reprogrammed myself to say that's a memory of my son. Reporter: She went to his I was like, America did this to him. This is a result of the ugliness in America. I asked god, why did this have to happen? Why am I looking at a man in this casket who should have been just arrested instead of killed? Reporter: And tamir rice was killed in 2014. Police shot him as he played with a toy gun. When you see the growing protests, does that say to you that something feels different right now? I'm very happy that they're out there. We don't want the message to get lost with the vandalism and burning and things like that. The message should be a clear agenda. Nobody should be comfortable in America sleeping at night with what is going on in this country right now. Reporter: Let me ask you about the protests. Are you heartened by the People need to protest to bring about a win. That's what protesting does. Protesting is not the complete end. If we have to go from demonstration to registration. Reporter: This woman is desperate for change after her son Eric Garner was killed by police officers in 2014. His last words, I can't breathe, has become a national rallying cry. We got to be about a movement. What has happened over the last, say, four months, this is different. The time has come for change. And I think that what has happened has implemented change. Reporter: The only woman to see a conviction after her son was killed in his home. Until the trial, I prayed and fasted and that's all I asked god for. To give her a murder conviction. Because my son's life was taken away. I am not too happy about the ten years. However, I believe god is in control. I am still fighting, I've reached a point where I was asking, when will it ever end? But I kept saying that I did not want to see another family suffer the fate that we did. And I am so sorry to Tamika and Wanda and to the other mothers who have lost sons. If America does not shake up after all these incidents, the tears that we all share as mothers will be the tears that will break America. I'm not normal. And I'm not really allowed to be normal, because of what America has done to my family. Tamir, I'm his voice. That keeps me really busy with the foundation and the platform that America has provided for me, because they murdered my son. None of us asked to be thrust into this world. None of us has a son out there. I'm willing to lead the way, push the movement. If I can do it, and I don't have a son out there, every black person should do it. I'm no longer trying to save the life of my son. That's gone. But if I can save the life of another mother's child, I'm going to do it every day of the week. And, I mean, I ain't stopping until I'm dead. And I pray somebody in my family picks up the fight then. Reporter: I have to say, as a mother of a 17-year-old black son and a 21-year-old black daughter, I don't think I've ever felt more vulnerable, frightened, and exhausted. And all of you ladies, with your pain and your purpose, give me hope.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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