Cameron Douglas on surviving prison and finding your way home: Part 2

Douglas was arrested during a 2009 DEA sting operation and served seven years in a federal prison, which eventually forced him to get sober after years of being caught up in a severe drug addiction.
5:59 | 10/23/19

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Transcript for Cameron Douglas on surviving prison and finding your way home: Part 2
from his old world to the radically new one. His name is now beneath his prison number, though his lawyers did manage to get him a sentence of only five years and he starts out in minimum security, quickly learning prisoners can get almost anything. You write "Steaks, lobster, vodka, prostitutes, heroin, good heroin." You know, drugs-- and alcohol are prevalent in every prison. About a year in he is caught flagrantly using heroin -- a furious judge hauls him back in court. My sentence was just doubled from five to ten years. Overwhelmed, I pass out. His temper and immature recklessness lands him in solitary confinement over and over again. You're in that little cement box 24 hours a day, seven days a week. He writes that for the first time he created a discipline, a routine. Reading, writing, working out, and meditating and And something else. For the first time since he was 13 years old, Cameron Douglas has long stretches without drugs. Was it prison that turned you around? It was getting away from addiction and allowing me to begin to see things-- more clearly and then, you know, the constant love and support of my family-- never giving up on me. There will be another lesson about how fragile life can be, His powerful father has announced on the David Letterman show that he has stage 4 throat cancer. So, I got cancer, found out about it three weeks ago. When Michael Douglas finishes the brutal chemotherapy, he comes to see his boy. And I've-- I've never seen-- somebody's body change so drastically. I mean, it's a real-- it's a real fight for your life and There will be one more visitor. The founder of that dynasty of tough Douglas men. 93-year-old Kirk Douglas travels 3,000 miles to see his grandson. The grandfather who has made one plea to his grandson. Do you remember the sentence you quote him saying? Do-- "Do-- do what you have to do. And-- and make it home." Find your way home. June 13, 2016. Yeah, yeah. It's the day after seven years Cameron Douglas walks out of prison. I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul. Words he would need for the next part of his life. A new life with a new baby daughter Lua - almost two, and Lua's mother is Vivian -- a Brazilian former model. They first met a long time ago in his hard partying past. She decided to write him a letter in prison. He-- he was, like, slowly creating such a strong bond and also I started getting to know him in a whole different light. She's kind of my rock, three years after his release -- he is taking acting classes and some movie parts. He is also still on probation. He has regular therapy, he says, and people to confide in. Volunteering at a homeless shelter. He says he has a regular drug test and they show no heroin, no cocaine for five years. Going back to a life of drug addiction is repulsive to me. But still, do you worry about it? It's always in my mind, if I know one thing about addiction, I know how crafty and sneaky it is, you know? And as soon as you lose sight of that, I think you're in major danger. After all those years of constant worry. How does Michael Douglas feel now? I think he's been through the system. He's an ex-convict now. You know, listen, all you can do is hope. Hope - still a word on Cameron's mind. I wondered if he had a final question for his dad. I guess I want to know if you, if you truly gave up, if you truly thought that I wasn't going to make it out or you hell onto some hope that I was going to be able to pull through. Oh, I-- I mean hope? Yes. Hope, yes. But-- if you're, you know, asking me, yeah, we always had hope, but no, I did not think you were-- I did not think you were going to make it. The past that can be redeemed by the possible. Imagine five years from now what's the scene you dream? Well, we'll all be on-- on a cruise together and-- Cameron probably is havin' another child. Generations are going on. Send me a postcard, you two. We will. Yeah. Cameron's book "Long way home" is out now. Can you catch the full special on ABC news.com. We'll be right back with a final note. It stronger. Faster. Smarter. Because to be the best, is to never ever stop making it better. The 2020 c-class Family.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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