'Inside Out': Exploring Pixar's Latest Adventure

Star-studded cast talks about their new film about the emotions inside an 11-year-old character's brain.
6:14 | 06/11/15

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Transcript for 'Inside Out': Exploring Pixar's Latest Adventure
Tonight, the creative masterminds at Pixar taking us inside the making of "Inside out." They've already managed to snag 15 oscars with hits about talking cars or a little fish named memo. Now name miscellaneously funny ladies Amy Poehler and Mindy kaling play feelings. Explaining why a simple story about an emotional 11-year-old will no doubt get the rest of us pretty emotional too. Train of thought. Right on schedule. Anger. Unload the daydreams. I ordered extra in case things get slow in class. Reporter: Leave to it Pixar to take us somewhere we've never been before. Behold, the inside of an 11-year-old girl's brain. What was that? I thought you said we were going to act casual. Reporter: "Inside out" stars a preteen girl's mixed emotions. I'm joy. This is sadness. Reporter: That familiar chirp belongs to Amy Poehler. Joy? Yes, joy. You'll be in charge of the console, keeping Riley happy all day long, may I add I love your dress, it's so adorable, oh thank you so much, I love the 8 wa it curls. Reporter: The queen of "Saturday night live" and "Parks and recreation" embodies joy. To be in a young girl's head is kind of like a professional and personal dream. Reporter: Mindy kaling plays disgust. When I'm through, Riley will look so good. The other kids will look at their own outfits and barf. Because they're inventing every aspect of this, the setting, what it looks like, what the characters look like, on the page and what I saw in the movie are completely different. Reporter: They run the girl's brain from a control center, a complex world created by director and writer Pete doctor. What was the inspiration? Watching my daughter, she turned 11, she went from being really happy, crazy kit kid, to being quiet, shy, reclusive. I thought, that's weird, I wonder what's going on in her head. Reporter: He conjured up that battlefield of emotions. You based it on scientific brain research? It was really fascinating. Because a lot of these things, you kind of think of as negative. You know, fear. I want to avoid feeling fearful and acting fearful. But at its heart, fear is there to keep you from getting hurt. To keep you alive and safe. Anger is all about fairness. To make sure that you're not getting screwed or taken advantage of in some way. Reporter: A master story teller, Pete was employee number ten at Pixar studios, our corporate cousins. Hold on, woody! Reporter: While there, he helped craft the bromance between a cowboy and a space man in "Toy story." Those monsters under your period. Don't let it touch you! Reporter: And that heartbreaking, wordless four and a half minute montage of a marriage in "Up." The tear-jerker scene helped earn him an Oscar. You really do make people cry. It seems very mean of you. Well. Why does every movie make me cry? I think the reason you go to movies is to have that emotional equipment tested out and to feel like you're experiencing life at its fullest. That's what it's about. Reporter: It's all accomplished in the subtleties. In a monster's look. A brave gesture. I am Merida! Reporter: A shift in expression. As the film's writer and director, Pete has a special way with actors. Pete was right across from me. So it felt like being directed on a live action feature. There are at least 37 things for Riley to be scared of right now! Can you adjust it to be slightly more scared yourself? Okay. There are at least 37 things for Riley to be scared of right now! Reporter: Every sequence painstakingly created from sketches, clay models, and finally, animation. The closer she gets the more delicate and slow she's going to move. Reporter: The Pixar campus is chock full of amenities. A fun factory conceived by Steve jobs. This is the way to travel. Whoa! We're totally spoiled. Look at this. Soccer field. We have the swimming pool. People are working so hard that half the time those facilities aren't even used. I have never set foot in the pool. Reporter: The more creative types here pimp out their work spaces. And it opens that. Oh, just out of the movies! Reporter: Transforming them into speakeasies. Animators come by and have a drink. Reporter: Reporter: The planes that crash landed in jungles. Your brains are so fertile you convert these things. Reporter: These offices, a veritable restaurant row. The taqueria here. Sushi restaurant. Reporter: Animators are known to work grueling 80-hour weeks and it takes a full week to create just five seconds of film. We spend five years making a film. Three of that are just on the storytelling. And retelling it over and over until we have just the right combination. Oh, yeah. That sounds fantastic. Reporter: The result? A convincing depiction of a petulant, prepubescent girl. Are you targeting children or adults as you're creating the movie? The main person I'm trying to please as I'm writing is me. I want to entertain myself. And the other guys that I work with. You're not targeting a demo? No, not -- I've always found every time I try to write for a specific demographic, it ends up like I'm talking down or doing something -- I've got to be interested myself. Even though the films might been monsters or cars or fish, you always want them to be about us. Show me where we're going. Okay. Only -- I'm so sad to walk, just give me a few. A simple message is that it's okay to be sad sometimes. The bigger message is that, you know, you never know what's going on inside someone's head. We all have these emotions that are fighting for control. And I just love what Pixar does, which is it takes these big, complicated ideas and it makes them into these very beautiful and specifics in universal worlds. When she first scored a goal it was so amazing. Reporter: A little girl in a big world. Showing the rest of us we're not alone. "Inside out" will be in movie theaters June 19th.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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