Teacher helps start volunteer effort to 3D print COVID-19 face shields

After New Jersey middle school teacher Jacob Ezzo came upon 3D-printing plans for face shields, he helped build a team of volunteers that have made thousands of them for front-line workers.
5:55 | 06/30/20

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Transcript for Teacher helps start volunteer effort to 3D print COVID-19 face shields
Reporter: I've been living in New York City, but I was away visiting family when covid-19 hit. So now I'm sheltering in place in Iowa, staying in the house where I grew up. There's still the yellow shag carpet, all the treasures from my childhood. It hasn't changed a bit since the day I left home, decades ago. We thought we heard the angels sing. In the sixth grade, my favorite teacher ever, Mrs. Kelly, read us this book. Then organized this class project around it that was so incredible, it caught the attention of the national news media. We thought we heard the angels sing, about servicemen who ditched a plane in the south pacific. Reporter: Mrs. Kelly got us to write to the survivors and invite them to a reunion in Iowa. I think they're very brave men. Reporter: That was me before my voice changed. Mrs. Kelly went way above and beyond. You can't do this kind of thing without having a lot of teamwork. Reporter: And touched countless lives. I was reminded of Mrs. Kelly when I heard about what this teacher is doing with his My name is Jacob Izzo. In my normal life, I'm a middle school choir teacher in new Jersey. People say that they're called to do something. I know by far I'm called to definitely teach. All schools in the state will be closed beginning on Wednesday. The thing that scared me, seeing the news that there is a shortage of face shields for our responders. If they get sick, our entire effort to stop this halts. When I bought my 3D printer, somebody printed off a really cool baby yoda. I got it for that purpose. Then I got plans for printing the face shields. I was able to make the first 15, the doctor was like, yeah, we can use these. One of my sixth grade students was like, hey, I have a 3D printer. We talked shop about it. I was like, uh-huh. My name is Jesse bush. I'm 12 years old. Printing two of them, it pulled all the filament to the printers. I'm waiting to bring it to my teacher's house. They print them and we assemble them. We basically create an assembly line in our house. We have a lot of fun doing it. We try to do it the fastest. I inspect each and every visor, then I count out the transparencies that act as the shield part. Everything gets boxed up. Then we get a crew out to pack it up and deliver, and it's done. We can really see that they're using what we're doing. For kids to be in quarantine, any child is suffering through this. To be able to see even from afar that other kids are helping do the same thing that you're doing, and it's something that is literally helping save lives, I think that kind of gives them a sort of boost. Just really good to be a part of something and actually know that it's helping people. And then it just started to snowball bigger and bigger. The number of people printing has exponentially grown. The number of people who are helping assemble has exponentially grown. It's an army of middle schoolers and community members that have delivered thousands of face shields. I've made over 200 face shields. I think it's taught Jesse how you can just really make a difference just by doing something you love. To you, Jake, and the 3D printer alliance. Congratulations, and New Jersey thanks you. Reporter: When this is over, do you think you'll start manufacturing automobiles, like Elon Musk? This has provided to write and perform a different type of song. In some respects, this is my favorite and best concert we've ever put on. It's something that is truthfully changing lives. But for me, the absolute dream is to be put out of business. I look forward to the day when I can just go back to my classroom, back to my kids, and go back to making music with them. What I would say to Mr. Izzo, I want to say the biggest thank you. I have so much respect for how much he's helped. Reporter: I want you to meet my sixth grade teacher, Mrs. Kelly. Thank you for doing what you do. And your students will remember this all their lives. And they will think of you, and how you taught them to care about other people. Thank you so much. We'll be right back.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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