CDC acknowledges airborne transmission of COVID-19 is possible

After revising its guidelines three times, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that COVID-19 can spread in small droplets that “can linger in the air for minutes to hours.”
2:22 | 10/06/20

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Transcript for CDC acknowledges airborne transmission of COVID-19 is possible
Of course, all of this playing out with new guidance now from the CDC, the agency finally acknowledging that tiny droplets of the virus could linger in the air for several minutes, potentially hours, meaning after an infected person even leaves the room. It comes with cases rising in 32 states and hospitalizations rising in 36 states tonight. And more than 210,000 American lives have now been lost. Here's ABC's Stephanie Ramos on that airborne guidance. Reporter: As colder weather forces more Americans indoors, the CDC is finally acknowledging airborne transmission of the virus is possible. After revising its guidelines three times, the CDC now warning, beyond close contact, covid can also spread in small droplets that can linger in the air for minutes to hours and can infect people who are further than six feet away after the person has left the space. We should always acknowledge it, especially in indoor settings with poorer ventilation. Reporter: But infections are still averaging over 40,000 a day and rising. Hospitalizations now climbing in 36 states. This side of the unit is covid patients recovering from covid. Reporter: From Iowa to Utah, doctors are seeing sick patients who worry they won't make it. They're in the icu all alone, no visitors nowadays, writing good-bye notes to their children. That's not something that's easy to watch. Reporter: For many survivors, it's a daily struggle. In Cincinnati, 47-year-old Christine Wilson has been hospitalized three times since testing positive for covid in July. Every day I feel overwhelmed. Reporter: The mother of five battled pneumonia, has lung inflammation, is on daily oxygen and says she's on the same steroid as the president. I've compared iveing like you're drowning. I constantly feel like I'm suffocating. Reporter: David, the fda told vaccine makers they want volunteers monitored for at least two months after receiving the last dose. "The New York Times" reporting the white house was blocking those stricter guidelines, but the white house says that guidance was never blocked, which means no vaccine by election day. David? Stay tuned on that front. Stephanie Ramos, thank you tonight.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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