How schools across globe have reintroduced kids to learning amid COVID-19

A new report details how countries around the world are getting kids learning again and the protective measures being taken to avoid widespread transmission.
3:02 | 10/20/20

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Transcript for How schools across globe have reintroduced kids to learning amid COVID-19
Now to that new report about children and schooling during the pandemic. Taking a look at how countries around the world have reintroduced kids to learningerson and where it's working best. It could offer some helpful takeaways, Eva pilgrim joins us with those details. Good morning, Eva. Reporter: Good morning, robin. Yeah, the way schools open around the country and the world vary. This study looked at what worked, the protocols in and outside the classroom. This morning, "Gma" with a first look at a new report on children, schools and the covid-19 pandemic across the globe. As students from Cambodia to Afghanistan, Ghana to China return to the classroom, the university of Washington finding that while outbreaks have occurred in some, there was little evidence that schools were main drivers of transmission. In Denmark fourth grader Katherine Hamilton is happily settled in her fall semester. Are you excited about school today. Yes. Reporter: Denmark was one of the first countries in the world to re-open schools in may putting children in protective bubbles of 12 where they played and learned with the same pod of children and one teacher but this fall, school is relatively normal with larger class sizes of 24 and in her school of 1,000, no current infections. We have seen that limiting group sizes, keeping those groups linked together, these are things that we know work to control transmission. Reporter: Researchers point to another country with relative success in reducing the risk of school-based transmission. South Korea. We take turns going to school. The first week the seventh graders go to school and the eighth graders and ninth graders stay home taking online classes. Reporter: When ninth grader ji goes to school she must check in using a covid-19 symptom tracker and undergo five temperature checks throughout the day. Experts say it's critically important to decide which group benefits most from in-person learning? Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, focused on getting younger students back first. Germany focused on older students because they thought they could adhere more to socially distanced measured. Reporter: Others brought them back from rural areas who the government determined were less likely to have access to remote learning. Brian attends with six other students. In Rwanda, students are learning by radio. The united nations has been tracking school closures around the world and reports that nearly 600 million schoolchildren are still affected by school closures. And these researchers say it's important to make sure you have control of the virus before re-opening schools saying opening and then closing schools can have psychological effects on children. Robin. So true. Some good takeaways there. You can find more on remote

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