Front-line doctor opens up about his year in the pandemic

New Jersey epidemiologist Dr. Manish Trivedi reflects on what being a doctor means, especially during these trying times.
2:34 | 03/30/21

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Transcript for Front-line doctor opens up about his year in the pandemic
Back now on "Gma3" with some important reflections on this national doctor's day from the covid frontlines. The director of the division of infectious diseases of new Jersey atlanticare on how the crisis has changed one doctor and his family. I think what it means to be a doctor in this day and age is a lot different than what it was prior to the pandemic. I think when we used to put on our white coats and badge and wear our sthetoscopes there was an era of confidence we exuded and certain air of scientific backing. What my husband had to deal with was a physical toll on him working long hours, not getting many days off but also an emotional toll worrying about every patients and his co-workers, along with family. Being a doctor right now isn't about the science, it isn't about the therapeutics or the cures. It's really about looking to your left and right and trying to pick up your fellow teammates. I had a newborn baby about a month in, my wife shouldered a lot of the responsibilities and going to work and coming back home was a challenge, too. You never want to bring work All these healthcare workers and doctors were so brave in showing up to work every day. I asked my husband like, what did you learn when in school? How do you guys deal with pandemics? He's like, you know, this is not something you learn about. There's no protocol for this. One of the memories that sticks out the most for me was our first patient that tested positive. We were scared to come in and really take care of a patient but once we got our boots on the ground, I think a lot of anxieties and fears were alleviated. She was very sick, required mechanical ventilation. Was in the hospital for six weeks. She recuperated amazingly and was able to walk her daughter down the aisle for her wedding and she sent us pictures about those feelings when you see the pictures will stick with you forever. The emotional connections that you forged with your patients, the conversations, the little things you do in the room when holding someone's hand, bringing in a lunch tray, all those matter to people. We were family members to all our patients because they weren't allowed to have family members visit them. When I come to work and look to my left or to my right everybody that's there with me really has gone through a lot this year together. And that togetherness, that cohesiveness is what makes our team so great and makes me proud to be a part of that team.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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