How America is dealing with the digital divide crisis amid COVID-19

Millions of students across the country don’t have internet access, which makes it difficult for them to learn remotely.
2:28 | 09/30/20

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Transcript for How America is dealing with the digital divide crisis amid COVID-19
Turning now to "Gma's" special, back to school, making the connection. This morning we're taking a look at one of the biggest challenges American students face with nearly 50 million students across the country required to get online and learn. Over 15 million of them don't have the internet access, the problem of our country's digital divide is more urgent than ever. Reporter: In the mountains of New Mexico the school year is looking different because of the Due to the internet service the unreliable access, I have to deliver packages to my students so that they don't fall behind. Reporter: With little to no internet access on the reservation it's taking away connection to tradition. To keep our tradition strong is to continue to learn our language and without internet access, I don't think we'll have the privilege of that. Reporter: Some tribal communities having to seek good connectivity elsewhere. We had families that might go to town to go to a Starbucks or McDonald's to use wi-fi. Reporter: This is just one example as schools turn to learning of the digital divide widening due to the pandemic. 50 million children are learning remotely and between 15 million and 16 million lack adequate internet or devices to learn effectively. 9 million don't have access at all. In 2020 you can't be part of modern society if you don't have broadband and can't get a modern education. Reporter: From the smokes stakes in allegheny county. We did not have cable or the internet because we couldn't afford it. Reporter: To the streets of Baltimore city. 20,000 families even before the pandemic hit did not have access to broadband in the city of Baltimore, which translates to about 40,000 of our students. Reporter: And the southern city of Jackson, Mississippi. We are having our remote learning and virtual instruction and some who can't participate do packs to receive their instruction rather than logging in. Reporter: A pressing need for more permanent solutions. We're putting a generation of low-income and rural kids in an impossible situation. Reporter: But these communities are determined. We can't return to the underserved, underconnected pro-covid days. Our education and health are on the line. We have to think about what's best for making everything work for our families.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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