Millennials shift to new work lives amid pandemic

In a story first seen in the New York Times, as the pandemic prompted many to make major changes in their lives, some millennials have quit their 9-to-5 jobs to pursue their passions.
2:54 | 04/22/21

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Transcript for Millennials shift to new work lives amid pandemic
Turning to what's being called the yolo economy. The pandemic prompting many to make major changes in their lives because you only live once. Yolo as the kids say. A story we first saw in "The new York Times." Rebecca Jarvis is here with more on that, Rebecca, good morning to you. Reporter: Good morning to you, whit. Yeah, you get one shot at this life and if the pandemic has taught us anything, it is that fresh, new perspective. For those fortunate enough to have financial stability in their lives, embracing yolo has led to some very big changes. By many measures of success, Brett Williams was thriving, achieving what he thought was his dream becoming a partner at a major law firm. I was very comfortable salarywise. We were doing well. Reporter: But when the pandemic hit, he had a realization. I was at home working from my kitchen counter ten hours a day and really miserable and so that's kind of when the dream started to fall apart. Reporter: This led to a total recalibration of his time. So after saving money during the pandemic, Brett quit his high-powered job. It's something "The New York Times" dubbed the yolo, you only live once economy. Millenials emboldened by the realities of the pandemic choosing to take a risk or pursue a passion project rather than keep traditional 9 to 5s. These are people who are hungry for something new. This last year has shown us that the world is very unpredictable, that jobs are hard, hard to do from home and maybe things might be easier if you were running your own company or doing something you really love doing. Reporter: Brett decided to join a smaller law firm as employee number three. Really thought I was taking a leap of faith but, boy, it was Reporter: Before you take the risk, employment experts suggest a few things to consider. Have an emergency fund. Everything is going to cost more than you expect and it's going to take longer to launch or get traction than you are probably expecting. Reporter: Be prepared to build a new network. You have to reposition yourself in the market as someone doing something else. You have to put yourself out to start building that network. Reporter: Be ready to explain your intentions. You got to start thinking about how the world sees you and start doing it now. Reporter: And a reminder here, you don't have to blow the whole thing up in order to make a big change in your life. In fact, you could continue with a side hustle or start one. There's online education through things like edit.org where you practice new skills and if you want to change your life consider changing the lives of someone else, another community, others through volunteering and through sites like volunteermatch.org, whit. You can get lined up with volunteer opportunities in your area that meet your interests. Whit. Great advice. The more I say yolo, the more I sound like a dad. My daughter is rolling her eyes as we speak. Thank you so much. Let's head over to ginger in

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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