Carolinas reel from the wrath of Hurricane Dorian

ABC News’ Rob Marciano reports from North Carolina’s Outer Banks, where the monster storm makes landfall.
3:29 | 09/07/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Carolinas reel from the wrath of Hurricane Dorian
Hurricane Dorian whipping up waves in the northeast. This is the coast of cape cod. Winds and rough surf. Further south Dorian leaving a path of destruction across the outer bank. Ocracoke island hardest hit with massive flooding and power outages. Some saying they'veever seen The misery mounting in Bahamas. The situation there desperate. Rescue crews searching for survivors. A new concern, oil leaking from a storage terminal on grand bahama island. The Bahamas press is calling it a potential environmental disaster. Marcus Moore has been in the Bahamas all week. We'll check in with him in a moment. First let's start with rob on the North Carolina coast still covering this destructive storm. Rob, good morning. Reporter: Good morning, whit. When you consider what happened in the Bahamas, the U.S. Got pretty lucky. Don't tell that too loudly to the folks around here. The Carolinas got hit hard. Look at the what the force of the wind did to utility poles behind me. Still tens of thousands of people without power. This morning the Carolinas reeling after the wrath of hurricane Dorian. Residents on ocracoke island assessing the damage after near record storm surge swamped neighborhoods. We didn't know it would be this bad. Reporter: Homes and backyards flooded. Cars submerged. This whole street under water. Choppers flying on the island to help the estimated 800 people who didn't evacuate. Winds recorded up to 110 miles an hour. Ripping across the coast, pushing water inland. Stephanie Ramos was there. This is getting pounded right now. You can see the waves pushing into that shore line. Reporter: The hurricane making landfall with full force bringing over a foot of rain and damaging winds. Winds gusting to 77 miles an hour. It's coming off the sound. We have surge, flooding, debris and water covering the water. We're still four hours from high tide. Storm surge inundating Virginia. Water rushing into Norfolk, flooding downtown. Utility crews racing to restore power with tens of thousands still in the dark. This after 20 reported tornados tore through North Carolina ahead of Dorian. Residents still trying to salvage what they can. They had three days worth of Dorian here in North Carolina. The way this state is shaped you get it on both sides. You get the atlantic surge flooding and the sound surge. Much calmer today. This will go down as number six as far as the lowest pressure of a hurricane hitting north Carolina out of all the hurricanes that have hit this state. Pretty remarkable storm for sure. We are rid of it for now. It is heading off towards the north and east. The northeast coast of the U.S. Is getting impacted this morning. I want to show you where it is. It's about 130 miles to the southeast of nantucket. Still a category 1 storm. Moving northeast at 25 miles an hour. Still accelerating. Here's what we expect as far as the track is concerned. Wind gusts of 63 miles an hour in province town. Oev over 70 miles an hour off nantucket. Looks like Nova Scotia will be hit next. They do happen. Hurricanes hit the maritime. It is rare.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"3:29","description":"ABC News’ Rob Marciano reports from North Carolina’s Outer Banks, where the monster storm makes landfall.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"65449980","title":"Carolinas reel from the wrath of Hurricane Dorian","url":"/GMA/News/video/carolinas-reel-wrath-hurricane-dorian-65449980"}