How a company went from making bras and girdles to a spacesuit fit for the moon

In honor of the 50th anniversary of a man walking on the moon, "GMA" looks at the company that helped make the famous spacesuits worn by the astronauts on Apollo 11.
3:01 | 07/16/19

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Transcript for How a company went from making bras and girdles to a spacesuit fit for the moon
We are back now with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch with the story behind one much the most famous outfits in the world, Neil Armstrong's space suit. David Kerley joins us with all the details. Hey, David. Reporter: Good morning, George. What a remarkable day this is going to be. The vice president will be here very soon. Standing in front of a lunar lander like the one that landed on the moon nearly 50 years ago to unveil a preserved Neil Armstrong space suit. On a table in a museum lab, possibly the most iconic suit in the world. It's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Reporter: Neil Armstrong was on the moon for less than three hours but his suit still carries the dust of that historic walk. There is moon dust embedded here in this suit. The lunar dust is embedded right there in the surface and tells its history representinging Apollo. Reporter: It took a kickstarter campaign and two years to preserve Armstrong's suit. 21 layers of material, some of it invented for this space suit but this was not the work of an aerospace company. Yes, try on a new playtex at your favorite store. Reporter: That's right. The woman's garment company playtex won the contract to build the Apollo space suit. Make girdles and bras and industrial gloves. Expandable fabric, things that could give a bill lit. The basic fabric was there in playtex. They had the technology. Reporter: Sonny and his team put together a film to sell nasa on their design. All those layers painstakingly sewn together and the sole of the overboot that left the footprints, their design but their first full systems test was the moon walk. So while the world was excitedly glued to their TV sets watching men on the moon, there was an anxious nervous man in mission control, sonny ream, wanted the walk to end worried something might fail. When buzz aldrin is talking about kangaroo hops and starts hopping and the moon, what are you thinking. Get back in the Lim. We're successful. We can declare a success. I don't care how many craters he wants to look at, get back inside. Reporter: He finally did. Armstrong's suit now preserved for us to see up close. Something that touched the moon and so many of us. Do you watch people look at the suit? So, I will watch people. I love to see people's it's very emotional. Reporter: It is pretty remarkable to be that close to a piece of history like that and see how it was actually came back from the moon with that moon dust still in it. Armstrong got on TV after the moon walk and thanked the folks who built that suit. Sonny basically says this was the work of his life. 1 of the 400,000 people that got us to the moon 50 years ago. Remarkable they'll unveil the suit. I highly recommend you come see it. Thanks very much. To ginger. Thank you, George. We head to Lara.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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