What are the concerns about the rush to have a vaccine?

Dr. Paul Offit, a vaccine expert at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and a member of the FDA's advisory panel, addresses concerns around COVID-19 vaccine development.
2:29 | 08/08/20

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Transcript for What are the concerns about the rush to have a vaccine?
Trevor, thank you. Joining us now is Dr. Paul offit, a vaccine expert at the Philadelphia hospital and a member of the fda's advisory panel. Thank you for being with us. You raised concerns about the rush to have a vaccine by the fall, a timeline pushed by the president. Why in your opinion is that timeline unrealistic and what are you concerned about? As long as we do phase three trials and do them the way they should be done which is a placebo perspective and tens of thousands will be tested, then I think the public will know whether the vaccine is safe there's to a certain extent for a certain people of time. As long as that doesn't get curtailed, we're good. That's what worries me. It's tempting because there are millions of doses being made at warp speed which is essentially a manufacturing issue. The administration could pull out a couple vaccines and say so far they're safe and they look like they induce a good immune response so let's put them out there. As long as the process plays out like it should the American public will be well served. I think a lot of people in the American public are skeptical. What role will you, as a member of the fda advisory panel, have in giving a stamp of approval? The public should be skeptical. Everyone that sits on that advisory panel is also skeptical. They want to make sure the vaccine have been held to high standards of safety and then and only then should one get it. I think people should be skeptical of anything they put in their body. I don't think people should be cynical where they distrust everybody, including the federal government. Are you saying that if it gets the fda approval, are you saying it's safe for them to take? I think -- you know, it's -- when you test a vaccine on 20,000 people and you can say it doesn't have a severe side effect but 20,000 people isn't 20 million people so you want to make sure there are systems in place to detect rare events. It's a matter of risk/benefit. If it's tested in 20,000 people, shown to be safe, it's 70 to 75% from preventing serious disease, keeping you out of the hospital, keeping you from dying, then the benefits clearly outweigh the risks. Thank you, Dr. Offit. Dan? Thank you, Eva. We'll move on to new intelligence raising concerns

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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