Why COVID-19 cases for children are on the rise

Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, discusses the factors contributing to a 16% increase in child coronavirus cases despite a relatively low infection rate.
2:36 | 01/27/21

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Transcript for Why COVID-19 cases for children are on the rise
Let's bring in Dr. Ashish jha, Dean of the brown university school of public health. Welcome back. Encouraging news from the CDC on schools and children and know the child infection rate is low but increased a bit over the last couple of week, about 16%. What is that about? Yeah, good morning, George. Thanks for having me on. What's happening basically is as we've seen large outbreaks in the country the last month or so, some very large numbers of infections kids have been getting more infected too. I don't think it's anything different. I don't think it's the new variant, for instance, playing a role. I think it is the part of a broader pattern of more people getting infected. Hospitalizations down over the week. Cases down over the week and now we do seem to be in something of a race between these vaccines and the variants. Absolutely. This is the issue in front of us. These variants particularly the uk variant which is widespread across our country is really starting to increase in cases and it's going to wreak havoc on hospitals unless we can get lots of people vaccinated carefully and quickly, I mean, so this is the race in front of us. So the president is announcing an additional 200 million vaccine doses. Is that number high enough? Yeah, I think the total number of doses we're going to have by the end of summer will be plenty. I think in the summer we will have a situation where we will have more doses than we know what to do with. I'm not worried about the summertime. I'm worried about the next couple of months and anything we can do to increase supply will be critical. By the time we get to summer we will have plenty of vaccines for everybody. Mitigation so important. You're seeing some doctors saying everyone should wear n95 masks to protect against mutations. Yeah, you know, in the ideal world we would have had plenty of n-95 masks. We've known go them and their value for over a year. We've never really produced them in big enough numbers to have most Americans have access to there are all tern enough. Kfn94s and kn95s. Still an upgrade. Most need to upgrade their masks with this variant. How much difference is this Johnson & Johnson vaccine going to make if it passes the trials? It's a single dose. I'm very excited about it. I haven't seen the data so have to look at the data. A single dose relatively easy to store. I think it will make an enormous difference. The problem is we won't have a lot of doses right away because the production didn't really happen so we'll have to wait for that but once it comes online it will make a big difference. Dr. Jha, thanks again for your time this morning.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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