Hackers tap into home security cameras and livestream to hundreds

The Ring, a company popular for making home security cameras, advises residents to use strong passwords, change passwords regularly and use different passwords for different websites.
2:29 | 12/14/19

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Transcript for Hackers tap into home security cameras and livestream to hundreds
We start this half-hour with frightening home invasions taken to a whole new level. Hackers tapping into those home cameras that you have in your house and inviting hundreds of other people to live stream their abuse. Marci Gonzalez has more on how to protect yourself. Good morning, Marci. Reporter: Eva, good morning. And there are reports that hundreds of people tuned in to watch live as people were harassed in their homes. Among those who were targeted, children who are still scared after some of these incidents you're about to see. This morning, a possible explanation for these disturbing privacy invasions. Hey, what show is that? Reporter: Happening across the country. Can you come here? I can't see you. Reporter: Case after case of hackers breaking into ring home security systems. What's your name? Lamar. Reporter: 13-year-old Blake lamonty giving a fake name when a stranger started talking to him through the family's ring camera at their home in new York. What's up, homey. I still see you. Reporter: Following him from room to room. The reason why I got the camera was to protect my family and it's completely backfired. Reporter: In Kansas someone peering into the Norris family's living room. Taking pictures of the baby. Sweet. Reporter: Commenting on their every move. That tree is looking really, really good, guys. No, put me down. Put me down, I have feelings. Reporter: Ring telling ABC news we have no evidence of an unauthorized intrusion or compromise of ring's systems or network. Vice news finding they're linked to new software on a hacking forum utilizing user names and passwords stolen from other digital platforms. They're taking known email addresses and passwords and plugging them into ring's back end system and waiting until they find one that works. Reporter: Vice also reporting the hackers live streamed the virtual break-ins on a popular gaming chat app called discord. They're basically making a game out of the whole thing where they would call up these people and say, hey, we're going to break into this smarthome camera and mess with this family. Reporter: Discord saying it has a zero tolerance approach to illegal activity on our platform. We terminated the server and all the associated user accounts. And ring says there are several things can you do to protect your security including using strong passwords, updating them regularly and this one is key, using different passwords for everything you do online. Dan. Great advice, Marci, thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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