Neil Armstrong was the 1st man to walk on the moon 50 years ago today

The world celebrates the 50th anniversary of the historic moon landing of spaceflight Apollo 11, when Armstrong famously declared, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."
3:38 | 07/20/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Neil Armstrong was the 1st man to walk on the moon 50 years ago today
It's been 50 years since Neil Armstrong took that one small step, with mankind holding its breath. Lots of events being held to mark this historic day and ABC's David Kerley joins us with how that moon walk is being remembered now. David, good morning. Good morning, whit. There are events all over the country. If you're really interested in this you can probably find one today. Here it is though. This is exactly the same kind of lunar lander, an ungainly machine. Two parts, the bottom part to land on the moon, the top part to carry the astronauts and get them back into orbit. They were thought to have a 50/50 chance of surviving what became a remarkable achievement. The eagle has landed. Reporter: As Neil Armstrong made his way down that ladder -- I'm going to step off now. Reporter: -- 600 million people around the world were watching on television. The single biggest event ever televised. That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Reporter: It took 400,000 people working on everything from spacecraft to computers to space suits, and some of those people became legendary, beyond the astronauts. Cap come, we're stay for t-1. Reporter: In mission control Houston, flight director gene kranz. The people who lived here and worked here, the room talks to them and you can remember the calls that cap come made. Flight controller is going to go for landing. Go. Go. Go. Go for landing. Reporter: Armstrong and aldrin battled alarms and dwindling fuel but made it to the surface, which for two and a half hours was their work area. Aldrin placing a reflector, the only experiment still working 50 years later, allowing scientists to bounce lasers off of it, recording measurements. Doug curry was a young scientist involved now and back then. My big thing was, buzz, quit jumping around like you're doing and get to work. Reporter: The three astronauts returned heros, mission accomplished, moon dust and rocks. Mike Collins, the command module pilot, left some doodles behind. This smithsonian 3-d look inside the capsule of Apollo 11 revealing the message Collins left twice. There's a story that you went back in with a marker to make it permanent. Is that true? I just didn't really want to say good-bye to Columbia without saying good-bye, and that was my way of saying good-bye. Reporter: Five decades later, we all remember or reflect. 50 years later, what did landing a man on the moon and bringing him back safely mean for the country and the world and for gene kranz? It really demonstrated the power of free and open society. All of a sudden we quit. It's a theme for America to wake up, get moving, build the energy and passion and say what America can do. I heard that a lot from folks in nasa who were involved, some of the astronauts as well, that it was quite the achievement 50 years ago but why do we stop really going to space. We've been in low Earth orbit but we haven't reached further. We haven't gone back to the moon. There are plans to do that in 2024. At least that is the talk at this point. Guys, it's a remarkable anniversary. There are all kinds of apps out there if you want to follow the final moments here as they happened 50 years ago, including ABC news live with lots of coverage of what happened on the moon. David Kerley, incredible reporting, incredible story, thank you so much. Really appreciate it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"3:38","description":"The world celebrates the 50th anniversary of the historic moon landing of spaceflight Apollo 11, when Armstrong famously declared, \"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.\"","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"64458209","title":"Neil Armstrong was the 1st man to walk on the moon 50 years ago today","url":"/GMA/News/video/neil-armstrong-1st-man-walk-moon-50-years-64458209"}