Protests continues as reforms happen across the country

More people against police brutality and racism in the streets as government officials across the country are beginning to implement reforms.
2:48 | 06/13/20

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Protests continues as reforms happen across the country
We move to the protests against police brutality and racism in America. Overnight more people in the streets, this as government officials across the country are beginning to implement reforms. The question, of course, do those reforms go far enough? For the latest let's go to ABC's Zachary kiesch. . Reporter: Protestors refusing to leave overnight, occupying more neighborhoods in cities across the country, demanding social justice and police reform in the wake of George Floyd's death. In Nashville crowds setting up tents saying they're taking back the people's land. What do we what? Reporter: In Seattle for the fifth day protesters occupied several city blocks. Taking over the area including the 6th precinct which was boarded up earlier this week after days of clashes between protesters and police. The movement here has been largely peaceful but not without violence. A gunman drove his car into a crowd of capitol hill demonstrators earlier this week. Daniel Gregory says he jumped in to help. One goal and one goal only, to stop that car. Reporter: Gregory was shot in the process. I didn't want anything bad happening to those people. Reporter: Several police departments across the country are adopting incremental changes. New York governor Andrew Cuomo signed a series of police reforms this week that put a ban on chokeholds and changes a measure that protects police discipline from public view. This is not just about Mr. Floyd's murder. It's about being here before, many, many times before. Reporter: In Boston the mayor declared racism a public health crisis and made a pledge to transfer funds from the police department's overtime budget towards community programs. We're listening. And we're taking action and that's what we need to continue to do. Reporter: In Minneapolis the city council voted to completely replace the existing police department and reimagine public safety. Committing to a year-long community-driven effort to rethink what policing looks like post-george Floyd. The mayor there has said he wants to make reforms to the existing system. Really interesting to see what we're seeing out of Minneapolis. We haven't seen anywhere else around the country take those kinds of measures. Of course, it's important to delineate between disband and defund. Of course, disband means replace, defund means to reallocate them to education or social services. A judge has been assigned in that case involving those four former Minneapolis police officers. He's a former defense attorney who used to work with senator Amy klobuchar when she was county attorney. Whit. All right, an important distinction there. Thank you so much, Zachary kiesch. We appreciate it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:48","description":"More people against police brutality and racism in the streets as government officials across the country are beginning to implement reforms.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"71233660","title":"Protests continues as reforms happen across the country","url":"/GMA/News/video/protests-continues-reforms-happen-country-71233660"}