‘Shadow schools’ provide working parents a learning center for their children

Organizers of these programs say that, by keeping children in small groups, they help in containing any possible outbreak of the COVID-19 virus.
2:43 | 08/09/20

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Transcript for ‘Shadow schools’ provide working parents a learning center for their children
We're going to start this half-hour with a real struggle for working parents, wondering how they'll supervise their children. So-called shadow schools are now providing a place for kids to spend the day, but are they just as risky as regular schools? ABC's Stephanie Ramos is outside of a school here in New York City with much more. Stephanie, good morning to you. Reporter: Dan, good morning. Organizers of these in-person learning pods say leaving a child at home to learn alone online can really set them back, adding that these shadow schools really help families that can't afford child care or tutors. This morning, communities across the country are putting together makeshift classrooms called shadow schools amid the coronavirus pandemic. The programs at these pop-up schools are specifically for students whose school campuses won't open this fall and for kids who may not have the support at home to learn online. We don't want parents to be in a position where they have to choose whether they go to work or stay home to support their children and watch their children on distance learning. Reporter: From California to Oklahoma, facilities opening their doors to try and fill the void with programs that look like schools, churches and ymcas set up as learning pods to help students stay on task and interact with kids their age. While their parents are at work. In California, some school districts already testing out the idea. It's like taking one of our schools and spreading it out over nine different facilities. Reporter: But some school officials are concerned that these pods of students will allow the virus to spread defeating the purpose of closing schools. I think things are very different for us than school districts. We are not dealing with the size, scale and scope that a district has to deal with. We are able to keep kids in pods so that if we do have someone with a virus it's only affecting a small number of people. Reporter: Above all, organizers of these shadow schools say they're in it for the kids so they don't fall behind. What we found was profound learning loss and childhood trauma. What we really wanted to do is prevent any more of that. Here in New York City, the mayor announced free child care options in the fall for 100,000 kids in preschool to eighth grade. The city says they're working to have as many seats as possible ready for the first day of school, adding more over time. Whit? So much at stake as kids go back to school. Parents looking for options. As many as they can have. All right, Stephanie Ramos, thank you so much. We appreciate it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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