Venice mayor says city is ‘on its knees,’ blames flooding on climate change

85% of the 1,200-year-old city is flooded after water levels rose 74 inches.
2:00 | 11/14/19

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Transcript for Venice mayor says city is ‘on its knees,’ blames flooding on climate change
Staying overseas to that state of emergency in Venice, the worst flooding in more than 50 years. Want to take a look at this. This is what St. Mark's square normally looks like and here it is now. James Longman is there with the latest. Good morning, James. Reporter: Yeah, good morning, what an absolute ka 'twas trophy. One of the most beautiful cities in the world now essentially under water. The water is still coming well above my ask kel here. You can see tourists making their way past the raised walkways. St. Mark's basilica. Water smashed through the windows and things could get worse, we're told. This ancient city is famous for its canals now at their mercy hit by the worst floods in half a century. Millions of dollars of damage caused as water rushes through homes and businesses. This man seen swimming through rough currents right in front of St. Mark's square as sirens ring out. 85% of the city flooded reaching 74 inches. Water pumps submerged unable to work. Not even high tide and the water is already halfway up to my knee. Floods in Venice happen every year. They're getting more and more severe. The mayor declaring a state of emergency saying the city is on its knees. He blames the flooding on rising sea levels caused by climate change. Tourists with luggage in to wading through the streets of the 1200-year-old city. Everything comes to a standstill. It put our trip on hold pretty much for the last couple of days. World famous St. Mark's basilica only finished a $2 million flood repair last year. Now inundated. Precious marble and bronze underwater. So what can Venice do? Well, a project to protect the city from the water started back in 2003 but people here blame politicians for delays and corruption which has stopped that from working. Meanwhile with every flood the danger gets deeper. We'll go now to the latest on

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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