How to deliver a baby with Dr. Jen Ashton

Michael and Keke are getting prepared for Sara's baby, just in case.
6:24 | 06/20/19

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Transcript for How to deliver a baby with Dr. Jen Ashton
As you guys all know, I'm about ready to have a baby. Yeah. Literally, as in there's a chance it could happen right now. So what if keke and Michael and I were stuck somewhere and all of a sudden little guy decided to come out? I'll be honest with you, I love you but that's not a skill I possess. Michael, you at least already have four kids. I don't have any kids. If Sara wants to have that baby, I'll probably just post it on my Instagram. That's exactly why we decided to bring in our friend, Dr. Jen Ashton. She has delivered over 1500 babies, to give us some advice if you ever have to deliver a baby. Okay, Dr. Jen. Can you sum up medical school in about a minute? You know obviously I've been praying deliver this one for a long time now. It would be my pleasure. I'm not your obstetrician but I do want to tell you guys there are some things that you can do if you happen to be somewhere and you hear that blood curdling scream and you know there's about to be one more person there. So first off, obviously you want to call 911. Don't forget that part. You want to get some professionals there. Then, Michael, we're going to use you as our woman in labor because I don't want to ask my friend -- Sara can't do it so take off your jacket. You think if she's a woman in labor and she acts like it, it will put her in labor? Maybe. Keke is going to be my assistant so you're going to get on the floor. Can I have a pillow so I'm comfortable? Get some props. Of course. Make yourself comfortable. You want to get the woman as comfortable as possible. I've seen -- Stirrups. I need stirrups. Don't start being demanding. Now, I will tell you -- I don't need you here. I'm here for you. Get out of the room. Leave me alone. You need to work on your breathing. You need to work on your breathing. Listen now, first of all, I want to just say, all kidding aside, if a baby looks like it's going to be born out of a hospital, that baby is coming out. You really don't have to do that much. Just let that woman do her thing. But you do want to assist her a little bit so you want to get her comfortable, and now, five words that I never thought I'd be saying in medical school, Michael, take your pants off. I'm just kidding. I'm just kidding. Because, because, sometimes women go into labor and they're wearing pants. Oh wait, this is true, you guys. It's true. If Y're wearing pants, those pants do have to come off. It's constricting, Michael. So you want to get some supplies and props. Hot towels and water. We have a stop watch to time the contractions and some towels. Hot water, that is a myth. We're not making spaghetti. They lied to me? They lied on "Little house on the prairie?" That's right. Go figure. Doctor, if we're going to do it, let's just do it. I'm joking. All: Michael, Michael, Michael. No, no, no, no, no. Take it off. All right, so then -- Cover my manly parts. When you start to -- you want to give the mom a little bit of privacy. Don't touch me. Don't touch me! You need to breathe, Michael. Don't touch me! It's your fault I'm here! Listen, all that is going to have to be hashed out later, okay? Dr. Jen, can I give one medical tip. Never go below the towel. That's smart. I've had three kids and never looked down there. Advanced maneuver. This is unchartered territory. You want them to come back, so. When you start to see the baby's head crowning, you're standing back, you're just supporting mom. When you start to see the baby's head crowning, you just want to put gentle pressure on the head. You don't want to shove it back up there but you want to protect the baby from exploding out like a greased pig. It will shoot? That will happen? Well, it could happen with you, my friend. After the first baby, babies can come out really, really fast. I didn't know that. So now the baby's out. Congratulations, you've just had this beautiful baby. The first and most important task if you are a bystander, get those towels that you guys have -- Give me a baby. Here's your baby. And you want to -- Where did this baby come from? They darken up. They darken up with time. You want to vigorously, vigorously D that baby off. They're really, really wet. They are wet and they need some stimulation. We call it tactile stimulation. I know you're grimacing. Okay, so you want to -- No, I'm breathing because I just had the baby. Now, important, you don't have to worry about the umbilical cord right now. There's a big trend to leave that umbilical cord attached for a while, but if you need to cut it -- and I'm going to show you, very important. I always wanted to know this. Shoelaces, okay? You don't have to show me right there. You know what I'm saying? Let me tell you, this is why I went into women's health. They are so much more stoic than men. They are so much stronger, aren't they, girl? You take those two shoelaces, tie it as tightly as you can and you cut in between as far away from the placenta and the baby as possible. That's not my baby. That's my baby. Last thing, and moms know this, this is the most secure position to hold a baby, between the ankles. You will never drop a slippery baby like that. You hold them like that? You hold the baby like that? Listen, congratulations, cigars, champagne for all of us. Thank you. I'll tell you what, doc, after this one and looking at keke's baby, she's going to have to go to maury to find that daddy. Dr. Jen, thank you. You saved me now with this one. It was so helpful. You did so great, mama. Thank you. I love my baby. I love my baby, okay? I am so grateful that these

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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