Helping the homeless through makeup

Shirley Raines channeled her own personal tragedy into helping others with Beauty 2 The Streets.
6:48 | 09/11/19

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Transcript for Helping the homeless through makeup
Our next guest is truly finding the beauty in giving back. Take a look. Shirley Raines isn't your typical make-up artist. In fact, her best work won't be found under the flashing lights of Hollywood, but rather on the streets of skid row. Every week Shirley goes out into her Los Angeles community to offer a helping hand to homeless women in need. Look at this. This is the bomb you guys. Her services range from a home-cooked meal to make up and hair care. That moving act of kindness has morphed into an organization she calls beauty into the streets. With her passion of giving back she continues changing lives one new doo at a time. You like it? Yes. We're here with the creator of beauty to the street Shirley Raines. Shirley, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. It's amazing what you created with this organization. You created this organization when you were going through a dark time yourself. Yeah. Tell us about that. I lost my son. Today is his birthday, would have been his birthday. He would have been 32 years old. I broke. I physically broke. It was my first born. My twin sister was like you can't stay in this dark place. I was there for over 20 years. I didn't have a purpose to my pain. My sister was like Shirley you have to do something with this. I was like what can I do with this much pain. Who goes through something like this and what's the outcome of she was right. Every September was my mourning month. I was crying and miserable. I started to look for something to get involved with. I started to feed the homeless. Someone helped me find the homeless. I was like this feels like a lot of broken people like me. It's okay to be broken. You're never be your normal. This is my new normal. I got out in the streets and started to feed the homeless. The queens was more interested in my hair color and make up. They were like we love your hair color and make up. I was like thank you, queen. Thank you so much. I was like do you want these things? Is this something you're asking me for? That I can help you with. I got that. That's how it started. I left the organization I was working with. A lady name Jackie came with me. She brought her daughter Miley. We started to do hair, do make up, doing color. Giving hair color. They didn't have their hair done. I was like you don't like the color. They were like we don't have water, queen. I was like I could boil water I brought the red solo cups. We were out there washing hair. When I created beauty to the streets, I thought I was changing the homeless. The narrative of homelessness is these people still want these things. What was the most interesting thing you found out? We have a lot of perceptions of what homelessness is and why people are there. Some people think mental illness. Some people think it's a choice. What are the surprising things you found out? The same thing that broke me and I survived other people didn't. It's divorce. Loss of a child. Loss of a job. I felt so grateful. All this time I was mourning, I felt like life hit me hard and I found the purpose of my pain. That broke you, but it didn't break me. I realize their stories are like yours and mine. It could be us at any given time. Any given time. The most important thing for any human is to be seen. Often with homeless people they say no one looks them in the eye. Absolutely. You look them in the eye. How did they react when they were seen by you? First, it was skepticism. What's in it for you? What do you want? You're going to come out here and feed me, do my hair and make up. What's in it for you? We had to earn that trust. They would see us continue to come back and be like that's the make-up lady. She's coming back. They didn't believe we would come back. They were very skeptical. I was like I would bring that next week. The next week I would get eyelashes. I started to beg from friends and I got on social media. She needs some help. I have a lot of people I need help taking care of. They started to see me come back. It built that trust up. They learned we were not a one and done type of thing. They started to tell friends. People would come up to my car. Hey, queen, I heard you got eyelashes. You can say it louder. It's just eyelashes. Queen, you passing out them eyelashes. Queen, you got that purple dye. Girl, I was like you could say it loud. It's for everybody. It went from there. You mentioned people that do it with you. Are these friends or family? No. It's an amazing team of volunteers I found on social media. Everyone came from social media. Jackie was on social media. This is where social media does its thing. Yes. My team is amazing. I met everyone on Instagram. They've come with me. They helped me. Then, you know, I like to go to the roughest place in the street because I feel like I had the roughest life. I want to go where nobody wants to go. I want to take care of the people that people say are broken and there's nothing good I'm still broken. It's okay to be broken. The problem with me was I was trying to be the Shirley before he buried her son. I'm never going to be that Shirley again. I started to go to the roughest places. It was starting to get rough. We had to call in reinforcements. Then we got this MC club. Look at my boys. The gag is they fine. That's the gag, keke. They fine. They fine. Mother's day we did facials on the women. They not only come out and protect us, they painted finger nails. They walked around with gold platters on mother's day. We had sparkling cider strawberries in it. They try to help with make up. We got our friends at Tish. And manic panic in nyc. They want to give you $5,000 and $5,000 in products to do what you're doing. Altogether $10,000. Oh! Yeah! Yes, queen. Thank you, Shirley.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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