How to fight the flu at the airport, on planes

A flight attendant and an emergency room doctor reveal where you should sit on the plane and when you should board to minimize your exposure to germs.
3:09 | 01/18/18

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Transcript for How to fight the flu at the airport, on planes
Back now with how to flight the flu while flying. People who are sick are getting on planes all over the word and the outbreak here in the U.S. Was particularly fueled by so many people traveling over the holidays. Nick watt is in Los Angeles. He's going to show us how to stay healthy in the air. Nick, we need as many tips as we with get. What you got? Reporter: We certainly do. Good morning, Michael. Well, listen, I'm a fake plane here at holiday which is much safe ever than a real plane now during flu season. One study suggests you are 11 times more likely to catch a cold up in the air than you are on the ground. So how do you keep yourself safe? A lot of it is on you. Reporter: Meet our experts. I wash my hands at every opportunity. Because the flu virus will love on a hard surface 24 hours. Like a tray table, armrest. Reporter: According to a recent study that tray table has 12 types more bacteria than your toilet seat at home. They clean those every night but not always between each flight. Time to wipe every single tray station. So intrinsically the bathroom is cleaner than out here. Reporter: I'm at L.A.X. 200,000 people pass through here every single day. Standing in tight packed lines and, remember, that six foot infection zone aund anyone carrying the virus can pass it on if they're sneezing, coughing or talking. And we're touching check-in kiosks. Hand sanitizer, hand sanitizer. Correct. They're crowded together in the boarding process. It's far more likely they'll tr tra transmit virus. Reporter: That creates that crush and tight packed for them to stow bags. Let the others board and give yourself a moment. Reporter: Window or aisle? The window seat has less trafc by it. Reporter: No one sneezing on you or grabbing your headrest. It will live on there for four to six hours. Decrease caffeine and alcohol intake. Both are shown to increase dehydration and decrease your immune system. Reporter: And plane air is dry. Every two hours I just pump a nasal spray. Reporter: Keeps your mucous membranes moist. Once they start to dry out we lose one of the most valuable defenses for preventing respiratory viruses. Reporter: So I'm in a window seat my air is on, hand sanitizer and also do not be afraid to wipe down your own tray table. You know, one airline told us that in first and business class, they do wipe them down between each flight but not back here in coach. All right. Nick, thank you very much for all that. Very helpful. Eight great information. I think I decided to drive everywhere. Yes. I agree with you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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