Harris County judge on the scope of Harvey devastation

Ed Emmett, the country's director of emergency management, tells "GMA" how the county is dealing with the devastation from Harvey and his biggest concern as the floodwaters recede.
2:22 | 08/30/17

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Transcript for Harris County judge on the scope of Harvey devastation
We'll talk to the director of emergency management for Harris county, county judge Ed Emmett and, judge, I know you're an experienced administrator but 30% of your county underwater and saw the cars abandoned. Any sense of how many people are still stranded? Well, probably thousands. But hopefulty they're not in danger of losing their life. We have people who are on the second floor of their homes and they're riding it out and waiting for the waters to go down. And what is your biggest worry right now? Making sure that the people -- we call them neighbors instead of evacuees, making sure they have a place that is safe, they can begin to get on with their lives again and in the aftermath, you know, these waters are dirty. They carry all kinds of shall we say stuff in them so we've got to make sure we don't have a health crisis too. The city of Houston is now imposing that curfew from midnight to 5:00 A.M. Why exactly is that necessary and how long do you expect it to stay in place? Well, the mayor imposed that curfew, they were worried about some of these flooded areas, the homes are left abandoned and they were worried maybe about crime and people going in. That was a classic case, though, of the mayor originally said the curfew would begin at 10:00, but the Harris county was opening the new shelter at nrg center and so he and I talked about it and so now it's 12:00 to 5:00 so the volunteers could get there to open the shelter. You have to be thinking of how you recover, how you rebuild your entire county after these floodwaters recede. What is the biggest challenge there? The biggest challenge is going to get people back in their homes. You know, I went through hurricane Ike, a hurricane comes and goes through the area. In this case, we've got probably 30,000 to 40,000 homes that have been destroyed. Working with the federal government and state government we've got to get those people back into their Normal lives as soon as possible. You know, school is starting. We got to get children in the right schools and parents back to their jobs so that the economy and the natural life can go on. Big, big job ahead. Judge Emmett, I know you're up to it. Thanks very much. Thank you very much, George. Amy.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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