Outlook for Republican agenda in 2018

ABC News chief political analyst Matthew Dowd weighs in on the momentum President Trump and the Republicans may have in the wake of the tax bill and comments on what they could get done in 2018.
2:45 | 12/26/17

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Transcript for Outlook for Republican agenda in 2018
Thank you, Kenneth and Paula. Let's bring in Matthew dowd. Matt, good morning to you. So, the president says it's back to work now. So, what are the big ticket items on the agenda as he heads back to work, and how much can he really get done now that the Republicans are down to one vote after Doug Jones beat Roy Moore in Alabama? You mn we're not going to talk about onesies and pink bunny pajamas you have. Thank you for that, Matt. I appreciate it. Revenge will be swift and unexpected. No, the president has -- I mean, 20181 going is going to be extremely consequential. Not only because there are serious issues to deal with immigration, trade, the budget, all big, huge issues that have to be dealt with but it's going to be in the midst of a midterm election and that always has impact on the ability to get anything done and the big thing the president has to face is that there is a democratic elected official who has no incentive to cooperate with him understanding it's a midterm election. Infrastructure, that's something a lot say there is the potential for bipartisan support there. I think it was always a question of timing. I think if the president had done that right after the inauguration, it would have been a package that would have passed fairly easily with a bipartisan support and would have probably helped to raise the president's approval numbers because the only time the president's approval numbers have gone up in 2017 is when he cut the deal on the debt ceiling with Nancy Pelosi and Schumer in that and so I think the timing is now off. He has now offended so many parts of the democratic party their entire constituency is basically sending a signal to their party leaders don't cooperate. They announced they negotiated a budget cut for the united nations. Do you see this as being part of the America first strategy and is it actually good for America? Well, I say it is more, it's my way or the highway strategy that they have in this -- it's an amazing situation with trade, with technology, with telecommunications, with travel that the world has become a smaller place, more interconnected and more in need of our engagement in it and this president is stepping away from that, becoming more disconnected, becoming more disengaged at a time when our success in economy and in the globe requires us to be more involved. Then you have issues like the Middle East and North Korea, the Korean peninsula that require a multicountry solution and when we step away from that at the united nations it retricks ostricts our options, not others. We enjoy your analysis and gentle ribbing. That wasn't gentle. Thank you. Over to you. From the world of politics to the world of sports, the NFL

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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