Parts of US See Spike in Flu Cases

ABC News' Dr. Richard Besser reports on potential causes of the reported spike in flu cases and the CDC's call for Americans to get a flu shot.
1:55 | 01/04/17

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Transcript for Parts of US See Spike in Flu Cases
Okay, Alex, thank you very much. No a health alert here at home. If you haven't gotten your flu shot yet, the CDC has a message. Do it now. Some areas are seeing a spike in cases. For the rest of us, it's matter of time. Our chief health medical editor Dr. Richard Besser is here now. This is on not unusual to see a spike this time of year. The only thing that is predictable about flu is we will have a flu season. There will be an epidemic. The peak is usually between January and March. Arizona, Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma, are having big flu spikes. New York City and Puerto Rico as well. You think the sooner the better. If you haven't gotten it yet, is it too late? I recommend between Halloween and Thanksgiving. There is a suggestion that the closer you are to the peak, the better protection you'll have. It takes about two weeks for the vaccine to work. The good news is is that the strain of flu traveling around the country is in this year's vaccine. How about the nasal spray option? A lot of people don't want the shot. As a pediatrician, it bums me out. I love to say flu vaccine, but not a shot. No nasal flu this year. High-dose for people 65 or older. A microneedle for people of all ages that don't like shots. And new recommendations for people with egg allergies. If you got the flu shot early should you get a booster? No. It's a gamble of, do you wait it out or not? Between Halloween and Thanksgiving, gives you the best surety. But it's not too late. So many people say they get sick when they get the shot. I know. Because so many viruss are going around. You could get one, too. The vaccine doesn't make you sick. Now Amy has the morning's

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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