Selma 50th Anniversary: President Obama Urges Americans to 'Speak Out For What's Right'

President George W. Bush and many Selma city leaders joined the president in remembering the march on Selma.
2:15 | 03/08/15

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Selma 50th Anniversary: President Obama Urges Americans to 'Speak Out For What's Right'
of history, the 50th history of this, the brutal beating of marchers in Selma, Alabama, simply calling for the right to vote and this weekend, a new March over that same bridge with some of those same marchers and with America's first black president in the lead and ABC's Steve osunsami was right there for history. Steve, good morning. Reporter: Good morning to you Dan, the Edmund Pettus bridge will be closed this morning and the families who remain in Selma will March across it late today. Take a look. Thousands from across the country crossing the Edmund Pettus bridge with the president, his family, president George W. Bush, the former first lady and thousands more cruding the streets of Selma, a nod to the difficult history here. We know the March is not yet over. We know the race is not yet won. Reporter: He said Selma is a place where the meaning of America was defined. The Americans who crossed this bridge, they were not physically imposing. But they gave courage to millions. It's requires more than singing praises it requires the occasional disruption, the willingness to speak out for what is right. To shake up the status quo. That's America. Reporter: On this very bridge more than 80 demonstrators fighting for black voting rights were beat down with Billy clubs by Alabama police. Congressman John lewis on the bridge that day and in Selma again saying his work continues. Get out there and push and pull and to be redeemed a soul of America. Reporter: Young demonstrators fresh from the streets of Ferguson complain that there's too much celebrating. There is a little too much happiness going on with too many dead bodies laying around the country. Reporter: Reverend Clark Olson here in 1965. This is him then. He and James read were walking back to a church when attacked and reed was killed? We were attacked by four or five white men. Reporter: One of two white demonstrators who died. Reporter: Do you ever forget that day? No. No. He says it's not right but it took the death of a white minister to change the conversation in this country and eventually the voting rights act became law.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:15","description":"President George W. Bush and many Selma city leaders joined the president in remembering the march on Selma. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"29479329","title":"Selma 50th Anniversary: President Obama Urges Americans to 'Speak Out For What's Right'","url":"/GMA/video/selma-50th-anniversary-president-obama-urges-americans-speak-29479329"}