New Sexual Consent App Sparks Controversy

The "GMA" team of insiders analyze some of the biggest stories trending this morning.
5:20 | 09/29/16

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Transcript for New Sexual Consent App Sparks Controversy
Time now for the big board. Our team of insiders standing by live to talk about today's stories including T.J. Holmes. There's this brand-new app on college campuses. What is it. A sexual consent app. What happens, two people get hot and heated and one pulling out a phone, read this, initial here, here, let me take your photo. State your name for the record and sign here and now let's get it on. Kind of a mood killer. Complete mood killer. The idea here, the creators say is you're creating a legal binding document of concept and intent. They put these things together, specifically for college campuses to combat what they say is the problem of sexual assault on campus. You eliminate any ambiguity. It's clear and you're making a record of it. There is a lot of issues with apps like this. Another one called good to go. That one shut down. There are a lot of concerns -- one is that I personally when I read it said, well, what it somebody is -- they say no. That is the biggest issue that people have. Several issues that are obvious but that's the biggest one, what if you change your mind. You are giving essentially a potential rapist evidence to exonerate themselves later on because you give concept -- it gives you no way to go back and change your mind. These things are created. What person, people think it's ridiculous. Two hormonal people will say let's read this contract and fill it out. That's another problem. They say it's not legally binding. The people that put it together say it is. We don't have a test case yet but it goes to a server that only police can access, a disciplinary board at a school or by subpoena. Jen Ashton, what do you think. I mean I think it's probably a good idea and well intentioned but let's talk about the fact the name sasie is almost a play on words to say yes and I don't think we need any more of this in the bed so probably more problems than good things. I think in theory it sounds good but I just think execution may be lacking. They want to start the conversation. Even if it's just not about the consent but gets two people to talk about affirmative concept and what it means. You stay right there. We'll talk about this. A new study that can explain why some of us age faster and why George does not age at all, people. Researchers at ucla suggesting that regardless of a healthy lifestyle, some people have naturally faster aging rates. Yeah. Dr. Ashton, what exactly is this study saying. First of all, in medical school doctors -- we're trained to actually assess someone's appearance with respect to their age because the thinking even in the past was that how someone appears externally may indicate what's going on internalle Ali with the aging process. Now, this latest study found that while lifestyle, yes, absolutely, behaviors are important. It's actually what's going on in our genes on a cellular level that may actually be more important. The good news, both represent targets for intervention whether with changes or with medication and, in fact, the fda just approved a trial to study a drug called matformin used in type two diabetics as a longevity drug. You'll hear a lot more about this in the future. We'll come back to you but want to move on to Lucy Danziger. I'm not sure if these stunt foods will help but we have a lot. Doritos locate coast tack coast, the whopperrito right there from burger king. Big franchises rolling out more headline grabbing meals. Lucy Danziger, branding expert and you have a new website we'll talk about as well coming up but what about all this huge calorie filled stunt foods? What's this about? Okay, so it's food as entertainment. I call it foodfortainment, the ad comes on, better be exciting. Everybody just wants to outplay each other. Well, are there any health concerns, though, because I see some of this stuff they're mixing up but I'm going, I don't know if I could handle that. It seems like a lot. Any health concerns with all of this big and bold. Of course, there are. Of course, there are. Look, you get adren lyzed. You're jumping off the couch saying touchdown. That's not working out. The players are saying go play 60 but we're not playing. We are actually going to gain 60 if we eat all these foods so guys see it as a mountain of tacos to conquer and women see a pizza as a heart attack on a plate. So for me, I think it's the scary movie of food and the blob starts right here. Jen, heart attack on a plate. Probably. Although I have to say I never met a French fry I didn't like. T.j., how about you? You have any -- I don't need a gimmick food. Popeyes chicken, I get it once every six months. They got one in the airport in Atlanta. I check the bag full of chicken on my way back from vacation. You literally made robin stand up. I thought we were in church for a second. Two-piece white meat spicy and fries. George, what about you? I can't pass by a big Mac every once in a while. That chick-fil-a calls my name every time. Something about it. All right. Well, thank you to Lucy, Dr. Ashton, thank you, as well, T.J., always good to have you. You got it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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