New Study Suggests Correlation Between Aggressive Children and Antidepressants

The study suggests children who take antidepressants may be more likely to become aggressive and have suicidal thoughts than was previously believed.
2:06 | 01/28/16

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Transcript for New Study Suggests Correlation Between Aggressive Children and Antidepressants
Right now we do have an alarming report that is getting a lot of attention suggesting that children who take some common antidepressants may be more likely to become aggressive and have suicidal thoughts than was previously believed. ABC news senior medical contributor Dr. Jennifer Ashton has the latest. Tell us about this study. This is the actual study right here, Amy. This is what we call a meta analysis and these researchers looked at many other studies, many other reviews, they teased through what they thought was data really done with a good method and what they found was that in adolescents and children taking antidepressants there was a doubling this their risk of aggressive behavior and restlessness. Really one of the first times that those two particular end points were studied in a cumulative manner like this. There can be flaws with the meth to go here so you have to take this with a grain of salt but it brings up what are the risks in this age group with this medication. So as a doctor, what do you tell parents in light of this new study if they have a child who is suffering. Listen, it's a very complex decision-making process. I encourage people, think like a doctor. You want to ask four questions, what are the risks of taking this medication, what are the risks of not taking the medication then ask the flip side, what are the benefits and what are the benefits of taking or not taking the medication and have to factor in alternatives like exercise, psychotherapy, a holistic approach and weigh that for the individual. This is not cookie cutter. And let me play strong devil's advocate there. There are people that believe children should not be taking these type of medications at all for any reason. How do you respond. You can't throw out the baby with the bathwater. In tact we reached out to the American psychiatric association last night that said in the right patient these medications can be life saving stow this has to be individualized and wrap this in to a mental health professional team. Parent, child, medical and psychiatric team and make that decision on a case-by-case basis. Thanks so much. Always available taking questions online on Twitter. Over to Lara.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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