Watch Ginger Zee transform into a primate using motion capture technology

ABC News' Ginger Zee travels to New Zealand to get a closer look at the motion capture technology used in the "Planet of the Apes" series.
3:20 | 07/13/17

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Transcript for Watch Ginger Zee transform into a primate using motion capture technology
Thank you, all week long we've been talking about that amazing technology behind the "Planet of the apes" movie. Now it's time for ginger's adventure with the motion capture magic. Take a look at how she went to New Zealand for ape camp. ??? Reporter: In New Zealand we made it to Wellington and we're ready to go. Wellington is home to Oscar winning blockbusters like "Lord of the rings" and "The jungle book." Their magic begins with the special effects company brought to life by Peter Jackson. They use motion capture technology or mo-cap. Pioneers in film. They make fantasy worlds. Transform actors into pri. Mates. I did not start this war but I will finish it. Reporter: "War for the planet of the apes," the third in the series, is by far their most spectacular. You know, a piece of fur and you dump some snow on it. In the real world that's the easiest thing. In our world that's incredibly hard. You have to understand how the snow accumulates all these different hairs and what they do to the hair and how it melts and fall off. Reporter: Most was shot in can ga but 30% of "War" was done here on this New Zealand soundstage using mo-cap suit, basically velcro pajamas with dots capture the actor's movements with L.E.D. Lights. Interest that such a leap of -- Exactly. There is a process. They see the dots and able to figure out where in 3D space all those dots are. In a way you strip it back to almost like, you know, minimalist theater. No costume. You're the character and playing with another character and we add the details later. Reporter: Got the suit on. Next I got to get my dots. On the suit there are exactly 53 sensors from head to toe. I plan on doing some twerking so if you could make sure the booty dots look good. They act as reflectors allowing cameras to capture every single movement or a couple of dance moves. The seven up here is where I'll get scaled. Look straight ahead. Reporter: Here's the cool part. A weta technician scans your body and creates a 3D image and digitally transforms it into any kind ofprimate. You'll teach me all things ape? Alan has studied the way they behavior. There is a natural swing in the arms. These are arm extension, slide your hands this there. The idea is your weight is distributed evenly over all four points. Okay. Good. Whoo! Not bad. Apes are strong. With a little help from Alan's son Gus we were ready f@r our close-up. Let's see how we measure up to the real deal. Hmm. Well, I'm no Caesar but not too bad for a first timer. Good luck, my son. It wasn't all monkey business, though. I had a little fun shaking it off. ??? Shake it off ??? ??? shake it off ??? Reporter: For "Good morning America," ginger zee, ABC news, New Zealand. So cool. That is so cool?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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