105 and still alive: Study finds rate of death decreases for world's oldest people

Researchers collected and validated a sample of 3,836 people older than 105.
0:51 | 06/28/18

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for 105 and still alive: Study finds rate of death decreases for world's oldest people
The oldest person recognized in the Guinness book of world records was 122. Years old could humans live any longer than that. A recent Italian study highlights an odd truth a person's risk of death actually deep creases after the age of 105. In the study researchers used to sample size of 3836. Italians older than a hundred died. After the age of eighty death rates began to. The study taking place from 2009 to 2015. This is an amazing finding that the study only used data from one country the Italian researchers came to the conclusion that though the longevity of humans is continuing to increase. The upper limit of age is still unknown. With this medical minute I'm Linda Lopez for ABC news.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":56242902,"title":"105 and still alive: Study finds rate of death decreases for world's oldest people","duration":"0:51","description":"Researchers collected and validated a sample of 3,836 people older than 105. ","url":"/Health/video/105-alive-study-finds-rate-death-decreases-worlds-56242902","section":"Health","mediaType":"default"}