More answers to your COVID-19 questions

ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton discusses if smoking can spread COVID-19, if dentist and orthodontist appointments safe and if anyone has natural immunity to the virus.
3:05 | 07/01/20

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Transcript for More answers to your COVID-19 questions
time now. Let's bring back Dr. Ashton who has answers to your questions. Always great. From viewers. Question one, can smoking spread the virus? Not directly, but first, let's make something crystal clear -- if you smoke the single best thing you can do for your health and for your life is to stop and try everything you can to stop. The virus can hitch itself on smoke particles per se, at least we don't think so. The field of aerosol science hasn't particularly studied that yet. What's interesting about smoke, T.J., if you can smell someone's cigarette smoke potentially that's how far a viral particle whether it's a droplet or aerosol can travel. So think about that. When you smell it, yes, you want to keep your distance from secondhand smoke. But also remember, that's why it's so important to wear masks. These viral particles can travel as far as that smell. All right, dentists and orthodontist appointments are they safe now? Good question. Listen, it's really important for us to keep those appointments. You know, a loft people, myself included, missed them. They are taking more precautions than ever to keep themselves safe and you safe. So, again, remember, this is not something that you're going to be doing every single day. It is important, risk/benefit. There's a risk, probably low, because they'll be all shielded up. The risk is greater to them because you can't be shielded up. Up next, what's a Hepa filter? Does it kill it in the air? They can typically block out 99.97% of anything in the air, dust, viral particles -- it doesn't kill anything, though, but size matters. The size of the sars/covid-2 molecule, the viral particle, Hepa filters will catch that. They have to be changed. They're expensive. A lot of work to be done in terms of environmental protection. But Hepa filters are a good thing. Do we know if anyone has natural immunity to the virus? I love this question, it depends on whether this person was born with immunity the answer to that is no. But natural immunity to a virus typically makes us think of, have you been naturally exposed? In other words, were you infected or were you sick? We do know that most people who are exposed to any viral infection develop some but, again, it bears repeating, how strong that immunity is, how long it lasts for this virus is not known. Other coronaviruses, they caused 30% of common colds worldwide and you still can get another cold. We don't know how long that immunity may last. Dr. Ashton, thank you. You can submit your questions to Dr. Jen on her Instagram @drjashton. We turn now to an overlook

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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