High school asst. principal holding mental health roundtables with parents

Rocketship Public Schools Assistant Principal Saymah Nah holds roundtables with her students' parents to raise their emotional awareness and identify triggers for their kids.
4:36 | 05/30/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for High school asst. principal holding mental health roundtables with parents
OK guys we move on to a viral post dies sol and in think Graham. It was an assistant principal same and not at a predominantly. Black charter school in DC she holds these. Round tables after school for the parents. Almost like a therapy session the talk. And raise their emotional awareness and identify triggers so they aren't in turn triggering their kid so take a look at part of a recent session. He. And in Basra. When van. There. And I fear that there. And. When we start our strategy and bring it back because I won here and I want to they share with everybody liked the conversation at duke and within. Instilled that believe in neck bought. Inside and though it actually shoals when he's in school. So this really struck me. Especially healing for black communities I'm so happy to have the same and not in our DC bureau. If they must first amazing work I groping a home where. We were just in survival mode so oftentimes parents don't have the time to focus on their own emotions and their wellbeing and that's really what your roundtable is all about yes. Yet absolutely so tell me about an a little that. Absolutely fell from that roundtable began and a place more meets again strategies to families around emotional well name some mental health but what did McCain Mitt. What's far more greater than that game but came. Safe place a safe communities for families. And parents both male and females who. She had their experience is what was going on in their lives what worked what wasn't working what they like what they dislike. And it's really dish area what other families and they began so motivate each there they began to build off one another they began to hope each other. And although we change the chorus that outcome was still the same thought I was happy with it. Yes I think it's a beautiful thing and then there's also as you know there's a huge stigma against in therapy and black communities so. How are these discussions kind of working against that. Absolutely. You discussions are. Opening the door. For parents to speak write and opening the door for them to express their emotion is. There's that taboo with that's being able to share how we feel. And it's created a face for them to feel comfortable in that but also it's created space for. Then to have been laying waste. To be able to express those emotions and that energy is transferable right it doesn't just stay with the parent both are skilled at their ability. And it's transfers to their kids in transport terrorists who their peers and transfers to other parents and and turning transfers to the community. It's it's really amazing so a big impact on the kids because what you have inside if your processing it and of course are not going to be putting that outwardly I want to someone. What has the response been from the parents participating business. There response. So when we first start in el Al the little skeptical. Because of the stigma around with the company because of the stigma around sharing your emotions you know I grew up. And a household where you know what happens in the house stays in the house yes and I was really scared you know what if they do in sharing what I think and feel comfortable. But it was the complete opposite. A families trusted each other's speech I think need they trust that the space. And I think in net right. We're doing. The work and it's starting it's starting to shift and I tell them after an especially you know this doesn't happen within a day. Distance. Something that we have to continue we have to continue to work act because we don't want to continue the cycle. I love it and I think it's incredible and I thank you for joining us and I want everyone to see it because it's so. Incredibly important as those so thank you say my thanks for joining us thinking and Kimberly.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"4:36","description":"Rocketship Public Schools Assistant Principal Saymah Nah holds roundtables with her students' parents to raise their emotional awareness and identify triggers for their kids.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/Health","id":"63376056","title":"High school asst. principal holding mental health roundtables with parents","url":"/Health/video/high-school-asst-principal-holding-mental-health-roundtables-63376056"}